Advanced

Tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis with comparison to radiography and computed tomography: a pictorial review.

Vult von Steyern, Kristina LU ; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella LU and Geijer, Mats LU (2012) In Insight Into Imaging 3(1). p.81-89
Abstract
The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate chest imaging findings of cystic fibrosis (CF) using tomosynthesis (digital tomography), in comparison to radiography and computed tomography (CT). CF is a chronic systemic disease where imaging has long been used for monitoring chest status. CT exposes the patient to a substantially higher radiation dose than radiography, rendering it unsuitable for the often needed repeated examinations of these patients. Tomosynthesis has recently appeared as an interesting low dose alternative to CT, with an effective dose of approximately 0.08 mSv for children and 0.12 mSv for adults. Tomosynthesis is performed on the same X-ray system as radiography, adding only about 1 min to the normal... (More)
The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate chest imaging findings of cystic fibrosis (CF) using tomosynthesis (digital tomography), in comparison to radiography and computed tomography (CT). CF is a chronic systemic disease where imaging has long been used for monitoring chest status. CT exposes the patient to a substantially higher radiation dose than radiography, rendering it unsuitable for the often needed repeated examinations of these patients. Tomosynthesis has recently appeared as an interesting low dose alternative to CT, with an effective dose of approximately 0.08 mSv for children and 0.12 mSv for adults. Tomosynthesis is performed on the same X-ray system as radiography, adding only about 1 min to the normal examination time. Typical pulmonary changes in CF such as mucus plugging, bronchial wall thickening, and bronchiectases are shown in significantly better detail with tomosynthesis than with traditional radiography. In addition, the cost for a tomosynthesis examination is low compared to CT. To reduce the radiation burden of patients with CF it is important to consider low dose alternatives to CT, especially in the paediatric population. Tomosynthesis has a lower radiation dose than CT and gives a superior visualisation of pulmonary CF changes compared to radiography. It is important to further determine the role of tomosynthesis for monitoring disease progression in CF. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Insight Into Imaging
volume
3
issue
1
pages
81 - 89
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • PMID:22696001
  • Scopus:84865660036
ISSN
1869-4101
DOI
10.1007/s13244-011-0137-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b232e273-1765-46e7-973a-d04f7d284a55 (old id 2859450)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22696001?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-07-04 17:36:14
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:30:48
@misc{b232e273-1765-46e7-973a-d04f7d284a55,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate chest imaging findings of cystic fibrosis (CF) using tomosynthesis (digital tomography), in comparison to radiography and computed tomography (CT). CF is a chronic systemic disease where imaging has long been used for monitoring chest status. CT exposes the patient to a substantially higher radiation dose than radiography, rendering it unsuitable for the often needed repeated examinations of these patients. Tomosynthesis has recently appeared as an interesting low dose alternative to CT, with an effective dose of approximately 0.08 mSv for children and 0.12 mSv for adults. Tomosynthesis is performed on the same X-ray system as radiography, adding only about 1 min to the normal examination time. Typical pulmonary changes in CF such as mucus plugging, bronchial wall thickening, and bronchiectases are shown in significantly better detail with tomosynthesis than with traditional radiography. In addition, the cost for a tomosynthesis examination is low compared to CT. To reduce the radiation burden of patients with CF it is important to consider low dose alternatives to CT, especially in the paediatric population. Tomosynthesis has a lower radiation dose than CT and gives a superior visualisation of pulmonary CF changes compared to radiography. It is important to further determine the role of tomosynthesis for monitoring disease progression in CF.},
  author       = {Vult von Steyern, Kristina and Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella and Geijer, Mats},
  issn         = {1869-4101},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {81--89},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa855228)},
  series       = {Insight Into Imaging},
  title        = {Tomosynthesis in pulmonary cystic fibrosis with comparison to radiography and computed tomography: a pictorial review.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13244-011-0137-9},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2012},
}