Advanced

Studies of cadmium, mercury and lead in man. The value of X-ray fluorescence measurements in vivo

Börjesson, Jimmy (1996)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular Abstract in Swedish

Bestämning av koncentrationen av kadmium, kvicksilver och bly i människokroppen. Värdet av röntgenfluorescensmätningar in vivo.
Abstract
Two XRF methods have been used for in vivo studies of mercury, cadmium and lead. Persons with a history of long-term occupational mercury exposure had elevated mercury concentrations in their kidneys (up to 65 µg/g). The minimum detectable concentration varied between 12 and 45 µg/g. Battery plant workers had elevated cadmium concentrations in their kidneys (up to 350 µg/g) and liver (up to 80 µg/g), with mean values about 3-5 times higher than the general population. The mean ratio between concentrations of cadmium in kidney and liver was 7. Levels in kidney and liver indicated that a simple integration of cadmium in work-place air is not sufficient to describe the body burden. Fingerbone lead in smelters was 6-8 times higher than in... (More)
Two XRF methods have been used for in vivo studies of mercury, cadmium and lead. Persons with a history of long-term occupational mercury exposure had elevated mercury concentrations in their kidneys (up to 65 µg/g). The minimum detectable concentration varied between 12 and 45 µg/g. Battery plant workers had elevated cadmium concentrations in their kidneys (up to 350 µg/g) and liver (up to 80 µg/g), with mean values about 3-5 times higher than the general population. The mean ratio between concentrations of cadmium in kidney and liver was 7. Levels in kidney and liver indicated that a simple integration of cadmium in work-place air is not sufficient to describe the body burden. Fingerbone lead in smelters was 6-8 times higher than in members of the general population. The half-time of bone lead in active workers was estimated to about 5 years during the accumulation phase. A model for description of a person’s lead exposure in terms of lead in fingerbone, lead in blood and time of exposure has been developed and can be used, e.g. for retrospective blood lead estimates if the period of exposure and the current fingerbone lead is known. This will be of value for the evaluation of toxic effects of long-term lead exposure when data on previous lead levels are lacking. In total, in vivo measurements of mercury, cadmium and lead give unique information, which has shown to be an important tool for understanding of metal kinetics and toxicity. If the precision and accuracy of the method can be further improved, the technique will also have a given place in the clinical practice. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
opponent
  • Professor Chettle, David R., McMaster Univ. Canada
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Physics, exposure assessment, smelter, half-time, fingerbone, occupational exposure, bone, thyroid, liver, kidney cortex, lead, mercury, cadmium, XRF, in vivo, Fysik, Chemistry, Kemi
pages
64 pages
publisher
Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University
defense location
Malmö University Hospital
defense date
1996-09-14 10:15
external identifiers
  • Other:ISRN: LUNFD6/(NFRF-1007)/1-1(1996), LUMEDW/(MEMR-1007)/1-1(1996)
ISBN
91-628-2140-7
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
84765294-1ca0-442d-bef6-1739431c513e (old id 28596)
date added to LUP
2007-06-11 17:00:51
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:06
@misc{84765294-1ca0-442d-bef6-1739431c513e,
  abstract     = {Two XRF methods have been used for in vivo studies of mercury, cadmium and lead. Persons with a history of long-term occupational mercury exposure had elevated mercury concentrations in their kidneys (up to 65 µg/g). The minimum detectable concentration varied between 12 and 45 µg/g. Battery plant workers had elevated cadmium concentrations in their kidneys (up to 350 µg/g) and liver (up to 80 µg/g), with mean values about 3-5 times higher than the general population. The mean ratio between concentrations of cadmium in kidney and liver was 7. Levels in kidney and liver indicated that a simple integration of cadmium in work-place air is not sufficient to describe the body burden. Fingerbone lead in smelters was 6-8 times higher than in members of the general population. The half-time of bone lead in active workers was estimated to about 5 years during the accumulation phase. A model for description of a person’s lead exposure in terms of lead in fingerbone, lead in blood and time of exposure has been developed and can be used, e.g. for retrospective blood lead estimates if the period of exposure and the current fingerbone lead is known. This will be of value for the evaluation of toxic effects of long-term lead exposure when data on previous lead levels are lacking. In total, in vivo measurements of mercury, cadmium and lead give unique information, which has shown to be an important tool for understanding of metal kinetics and toxicity. If the precision and accuracy of the method can be further improved, the technique will also have a given place in the clinical practice.},
  author       = {Börjesson, Jimmy},
  isbn         = {91-628-2140-7},
  keyword      = {Physics,exposure assessment,smelter,half-time,fingerbone,occupational exposure,bone,thyroid,liver,kidney cortex,lead,mercury,cadmium,XRF,in vivo,Fysik,Chemistry,Kemi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {64},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x84de050)},
  title        = {Studies of cadmium, mercury and lead in man. The value of X-ray fluorescence measurements in vivo},
  year         = {1996},
}