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Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves: clinical investigation and chemical analyses.

Pontén, Ann LU ; Hamnerius, Nils LU ; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Hansson, Christer LU ; Persson, Christina LU ; Svedman, Cecilia LU ; Thörneby Andersson, Kirsten and Bergendorff, Ola LU (2012) In Contact Dermatitis
Abstract
Background An increased frequency of occupational contact hand dermatitis among surgical operating theatre personnel has been noticed. Objectives To evaluate patients with occupational contact dermatitis caused by their rubber gloves, and to describe a method for analysing the content of the allergens in the gloves. Materials and methods Patch tests were performed with the baseline series, a rubber chemical series, and the patients' own gloves. A method for analysing 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG) and cetylpyridinium chloride in the gloves was developed. Results Contact allergy to thiuram mix was found in 8 of 16 patients, whereas 12 of 16 patients reacted to DPG. In 7 of 8 patients, contact allergy to cetylpyridinium chloride was found. In... (More)
Background An increased frequency of occupational contact hand dermatitis among surgical operating theatre personnel has been noticed. Objectives To evaluate patients with occupational contact dermatitis caused by their rubber gloves, and to describe a method for analysing the content of the allergens in the gloves. Materials and methods Patch tests were performed with the baseline series, a rubber chemical series, and the patients' own gloves. A method for analysing 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG) and cetylpyridinium chloride in the gloves was developed. Results Contact allergy to thiuram mix was found in 8 of 16 patients, whereas 12 of 16 patients reacted to DPG. In 7 of 8 patients, contact allergy to cetylpyridinium chloride was found. In the patients' gloves, cetylpyridinium chloride and DPG were detected at higher concentrations on the inside of the gloves than on the outside. Most patients had worked for decades in their present occupations, but their hand dermatitis had only been present for months. Conclusion Contact allergy to DPG in gloves has been disputed, but, in this study, we were able to confirm the presence of DPG and cetylpyridinium chloride in the causative gloves by using a modified method for the analysis. The presence of these chemicals in gloves caused an increase in occupational contact dermatitis in surgical operating theatre personnel. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Contact Dermatitis
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • WOS:000313122000006
  • PMID:23206313
  • Scopus:84872056832
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.12010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a63b9aa7-6e88-4d3b-a4c2-80521db99e45 (old id 3347687)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23206313?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-01-02 11:44:46
date last changed
2016-11-27 04:26:04
@misc{a63b9aa7-6e88-4d3b-a4c2-80521db99e45,
  abstract     = {Background An increased frequency of occupational contact hand dermatitis among surgical operating theatre personnel has been noticed. Objectives To evaluate patients with occupational contact dermatitis caused by their rubber gloves, and to describe a method for analysing the content of the allergens in the gloves. Materials and methods Patch tests were performed with the baseline series, a rubber chemical series, and the patients' own gloves. A method for analysing 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG) and cetylpyridinium chloride in the gloves was developed. Results Contact allergy to thiuram mix was found in 8 of 16 patients, whereas 12 of 16 patients reacted to DPG. In 7 of 8 patients, contact allergy to cetylpyridinium chloride was found. In the patients' gloves, cetylpyridinium chloride and DPG were detected at higher concentrations on the inside of the gloves than on the outside. Most patients had worked for decades in their present occupations, but their hand dermatitis had only been present for months. Conclusion Contact allergy to DPG in gloves has been disputed, but, in this study, we were able to confirm the presence of DPG and cetylpyridinium chloride in the causative gloves by using a modified method for the analysis. The presence of these chemicals in gloves caused an increase in occupational contact dermatitis in surgical operating theatre personnel.},
  author       = {Pontén, Ann and Hamnerius, Nils and Bruze, Magnus and Hansson, Christer and Persson, Christina and Svedman, Cecilia and Thörneby Andersson, Kirsten and Bergendorff, Ola},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xba3e688)},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves: clinical investigation and chemical analyses.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12010},
  year         = {2012},
}