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Hygrothermal conditions in exterior walls for passive houses in cold climate considering future climate scenario

Berggren, Björn LU and Wall, Maria LU (2012) 5th Nordic Passive House Conference
Abstract
Reduction of energy use constitutes as an important measure for climate change mitigation. Buildings today account for 40% of the world’s primary energy use and 24% of the greenhouse gas emissions [International Energy Agency (IEA) 2011]0. The concept of passive houses is one of many necessary measures for climate change mitigation. To reach the passive house ambition in cold climates, increased thermal resistance of the building envelope is vital. Increasing the thermal resistance in combination with climate change will result in a different microclimate within the building envelope.

Possible future micro climate in exterior walls are produced by hygrothermal simulations using the numerical software WUFI . The simulations are... (More)
Reduction of energy use constitutes as an important measure for climate change mitigation. Buildings today account for 40% of the world’s primary energy use and 24% of the greenhouse gas emissions [International Energy Agency (IEA) 2011]0. The concept of passive houses is one of many necessary measures for climate change mitigation. To reach the passive house ambition in cold climates, increased thermal resistance of the building envelope is vital. Increasing the thermal resistance in combination with climate change will result in a different microclimate within the building envelope.

Possible future micro climate in exterior walls are produced by hygrothermal simulations using the numerical software WUFI . The simulations are conducted for four different locations in Sweden, where the main difference is geographically in the respect of latitude, for the year period 1985-2098. Regional climate is based on data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, using regional climate models developed at the Rossby Centre, RCA3. The RCA3 model covers Europe with a horizontal resolution of 50x50 kilometres. The boundary conditions are from the global climate model ECHAM5.

The increased risk for performance failure due to high humidity levels is conducted by assessing the result from the simulations combining three different evaluation models described in, which mainly differ in respect of the consideration of fluctuating hygrothermal conditions.

The investigations show that the risk of mould growth will increase in the future. However, adding more insulation to the exterior side of a wood frame construction results into more stabile hygrothermal conditions. Based on the results from the simulations it is recommended that all constructions with bio gradable materials should be given exterior insulation to decrease the risk of mould growth. Furthermore, building elements must always be designed to have the ability to dehydrate moisture that has entered, whether it is due to driving rain, built in moisture or other reasons. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Passive house, hygrothermal, mold, climate scenario, climate change
conference name
5th Nordic Passive House Conference
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a21416d2-7d80-4b1e-b094-ad7e020e8449 (old id 3515970)
date added to LUP
2014-04-28 11:27:13
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:43:26
@misc{a21416d2-7d80-4b1e-b094-ad7e020e8449,
  abstract     = {Reduction of energy use constitutes as an important measure for climate change mitigation. Buildings today account for 40% of the world’s primary energy use and 24% of the greenhouse gas emissions [International Energy Agency (IEA) 2011]0. The concept of passive houses is one of many necessary measures for climate change mitigation. To reach the passive house ambition in cold climates, increased thermal resistance of the building envelope is vital. Increasing the thermal resistance in combination with climate change will result in a different microclimate within the building envelope. <br/><br>
Possible future micro climate in exterior walls are produced by hygrothermal simulations using the numerical software WUFI . The simulations are conducted for four different locations in Sweden, where the main difference is geographically in the respect of latitude, for the year period 1985-2098. Regional climate is based on data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, using regional climate models developed at the Rossby Centre, RCA3. The RCA3 model covers Europe with a horizontal resolution of 50x50 kilometres. The boundary conditions are from the global climate model ECHAM5. <br/><br>
The increased risk for performance failure due to high humidity levels is conducted by assessing the result from the simulations combining three different evaluation models described in, which mainly differ in respect of the consideration of fluctuating hygrothermal conditions. <br/><br>
The investigations show that the risk of mould growth will increase in the future. However, adding more insulation to the exterior side of a wood frame construction results into more stabile hygrothermal conditions. Based on the results from the simulations it is recommended that all constructions with bio gradable materials should be given exterior insulation to decrease the risk of mould growth. Furthermore, building elements must always be designed to have the ability to dehydrate moisture that has entered, whether it is due to driving rain, built in moisture or other reasons.},
  author       = {Berggren, Björn and Wall, Maria},
  keyword      = {Passive house,hygrothermal,mold,climate scenario,climate change},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Hygrothermal conditions in exterior walls for passive houses in cold climate considering future climate scenario},
  year         = {2012},
}