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Curation: Frameworks For A Robust Definition

Young, Philip LU (2012) Euprera Congress
Abstract
Drawing on a critical reading of framings which position public relations as a discipline concerned with ‘reputation management’ this study examines the implications of the dynamic tensions between projected organisational reputation and reputation constructed by a network of stakeholders, and builds a framework for the first stringent, academic definition of ‘curation’ that allows a nuanced understanding of a key concept.



Beginning with the proposition that an organisation is at its most effective when dissonance between communications and actions is minimised, it compares and contrasts the image of an organisation presented through “controlled” channels and the “aggregated” reputation that emerges through... (More)
Drawing on a critical reading of framings which position public relations as a discipline concerned with ‘reputation management’ this study examines the implications of the dynamic tensions between projected organisational reputation and reputation constructed by a network of stakeholders, and builds a framework for the first stringent, academic definition of ‘curation’ that allows a nuanced understanding of a key concept.



Beginning with the proposition that an organisation is at its most effective when dissonance between communications and actions is minimised, it compares and contrasts the image of an organisation presented through “controlled” channels and the “aggregated” reputation that emerges through user-generated (social media) content.



An organisation will seek to be defined by a set of values but its reality is the reputation that emerges from various stakeholder experiences. These experiences shape opinions, which are aggregated into a reputation, which in turn shapes relationships (Phillips & Young, 2009).



Of course, (brand) realities are not fixed, and the gaps, frictions and dissonance between them can arise from many directions. This might include the strategic evolution of the organisation, wherein it is the role of PR to inform the audience of new developments. Such a reading does not diminish the importance of persuasive messaging; indeed it may be considered ethical, and perhaps even desirable, for PR to play a role in creating a (consensual) shared un-reality.



Thus, this paper suggests a robust definition for the process of ‘curation’ that will be become central to reputation or relationship management (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
submitted
subject
keywords
curation, online, public relations
conference name
Euprera Congress
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8212871c-ddb4-4929-a052-f92f7b80a58f (old id 3732500)
date added to LUP
2013-05-02 10:26:43
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:23:57
@misc{8212871c-ddb4-4929-a052-f92f7b80a58f,
  abstract     = {Drawing on a critical reading of framings which position public relations as a discipline concerned with ‘reputation management’ this study examines the implications of the dynamic tensions between projected organisational reputation and reputation constructed by a network of stakeholders, and builds a framework for the first stringent, academic definition of ‘curation’ that allows a nuanced understanding of a key concept.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Beginning with the proposition that an organisation is at its most effective when dissonance between communications and actions is minimised, it compares and contrasts the image of an organisation presented through “controlled” channels and the “aggregated” reputation that emerges through user-generated (social media) content.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
An organisation will seek to be defined by a set of values but its reality is the reputation that emerges from various stakeholder experiences. These experiences shape opinions, which are aggregated into a reputation, which in turn shapes relationships (Phillips &amp; Young, 2009).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Of course, (brand) realities are not fixed, and the gaps, frictions and dissonance between them can arise from many directions. This might include the strategic evolution of the organisation, wherein it is the role of PR to inform the audience of new developments. Such a reading does not diminish the importance of persuasive messaging; indeed it may be considered ethical, and perhaps even desirable, for PR to play a role in creating a (consensual) shared un-reality.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Thus, this paper suggests a robust definition for the process of ‘curation’ that will be become central to reputation or relationship management},
  author       = {Young, Philip},
  keyword      = {curation,online,public relations},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Curation: Frameworks For A Robust Definition},
  year         = {2012},
}