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The Flintknapper and the Bronzesmith

Olausson, Deborah LU (2013) In Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen p.447-456
Abstract
The labels “stone” age and “bronze” age reflect what archaeologists perceive as trends in material culture, but our perspective is skewed by a number of factors such as formation processes and our need for dividing the temporal continuum into discrete units. The focus of the paper is on examining this transition from the perspective of the craftspeople who were making the objects which archaeologists perceive as central for defining a stone age and a bronze age. Southern Scandinavia is the region in focus. Conditions and constraints on the flintknapper and on the bronzesmith, respectively, are compared and contrasted. No specialists can be discerned in the realm of flintknapping. As would be expected of a new technology, domestic... (More)
The labels “stone” age and “bronze” age reflect what archaeologists perceive as trends in material culture, but our perspective is skewed by a number of factors such as formation processes and our need for dividing the temporal continuum into discrete units. The focus of the paper is on examining this transition from the perspective of the craftspeople who were making the objects which archaeologists perceive as central for defining a stone age and a bronze age. Southern Scandinavia is the region in focus. Conditions and constraints on the flintknapper and on the bronzesmith, respectively, are compared and contrasted. No specialists can be discerned in the realm of flintknapping. As would be expected of a new technology, domestic copper/bronze casting begins somewhat hesitantly. The number of forms is limited and metal alloys are heterogeneous. By Period IB of the Bronze Age, however, we see a bifurcation whereby we can distinguish between elaborate and complicated bronzeworking using a standardized raw material on the one hand, and simpler, less complicated crafting, on the other. This confirms Kristian Kristiansen’s conclusion from 1987 (p. 46) that bronze specialists had emerged by Period II. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Flintknapper, bronzesmith, specialists, bronze, copper, flint
in
Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen
editor
Bergerbrant, Sophie and Sabatini, Serena
pages
447 - 456
publisher
Archaeopress
ISBN
978 1 4073 1126 5
project
Social Dimensions of Technological Change
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa74680f-f57a-4e1a-b15a-97063b5c8d02 (old id 3917501)
date added to LUP
2013-07-29 08:41:35
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:26:54
@misc{aa74680f-f57a-4e1a-b15a-97063b5c8d02,
  abstract     = {The labels “stone” age and “bronze” age reflect what archaeologists perceive as trends in material culture, but our perspective is skewed by a number of factors such as formation processes and our need for dividing the temporal continuum into discrete units. The focus of the paper is on examining this transition from the perspective of the craftspeople who were making the objects which archaeologists perceive as central for defining a stone age and a bronze age. Southern Scandinavia is the region in focus. Conditions and constraints on the flintknapper and on the bronzesmith, respectively, are compared and contrasted. No specialists can be discerned in the realm of flintknapping. As would be expected of a new technology, domestic copper/bronze casting begins somewhat hesitantly. The number of forms is limited and metal alloys are heterogeneous. By Period IB of the Bronze Age, however, we see a bifurcation whereby we can distinguish between elaborate and complicated bronzeworking using a standardized raw material on the one hand, and simpler, less complicated crafting, on the other. This confirms Kristian Kristiansen’s conclusion from 1987 (p. 46) that bronze specialists had emerged by Period II.},
  author       = {Olausson, Deborah},
  editor       = {Bergerbrant, Sophie and Sabatini, Serena},
  isbn         = {978 1 4073 1126 5},
  keyword      = {Flintknapper,bronzesmith,specialists,bronze,copper,flint},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {447--456},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb823470)},
  series       = {Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen},
  title        = {The Flintknapper and the Bronzesmith},
  year         = {2013},
}