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Stories after the Bosnian War: Competition for Victimhood

Basic, Goran LU (2013) Annual International Conference on Forensic Science – Criminalistics Research (FSCR) In Proceedings of the 1st Annual International Conference on Forensic Sciences & Criminalistics Research (FSCR 2013) p.68-77
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

The aim of this article is to analyze verbally portrayed experiences of 27 survivors of the 1990’s war in northwestern Bosnia. Focus lies on describing how the interviewees portray the social phenomenon of ”victimhood”, and to analyze discoursive patterns which contribute to constructing the cathegory ”victim”. When, after the war, different actors claim this ”victim” status it sparks a competition for victimhood. Cathegories appear and they are: ”the remainders” those who lived in northwestern Bosnia before, during and after the war; “the fugitives” those who driven into northwestern Bosnia during the war; “the returnees” those who returned after the war and “the diaspora” those who were driven out... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

The aim of this article is to analyze verbally portrayed experiences of 27 survivors of the 1990’s war in northwestern Bosnia. Focus lies on describing how the interviewees portray the social phenomenon of ”victimhood”, and to analyze discoursive patterns which contribute to constructing the cathegory ”victim”. When, after the war, different actors claim this ”victim” status it sparks a competition for victimhood. Cathegories appear and they are: ”the remainders” those who lived in northwestern Bosnia before, during and after the war; “the fugitives” those who driven into northwestern Bosnia during the war; “the returnees” those who returned after the war and “the diaspora” those who were driven out from northwestern Bosnia and remained in their new country. The competition between these cathegories seems to take place on a symbolic level. All interviewees want to portray themselves as ”ideal victims” but they are all about to loose that status. The returnees and the diaspora are losing status by receiving recognition from the surrounding community and because they have a higher economic status, the remainders are losing status since they are constantly being haunted by war events and the refugees are losing status by being presented as strangers and thus fitting the role of ideal perpetrators. It seems that by reproducing this competition for the victim role, all demarcations, which were played out so skillfully during the war, are kept alive. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
crime, victimhood, victim, war, perpetrator, Bosnia, sociology, sociologi
in
Proceedings of the 1st Annual International Conference on Forensic Sciences & Criminalistics Research (FSCR 2013)
editor
Cheng, Lui-Lung
pages
68 - 77
publisher
Global Science and Technology Forum (GSTF)
conference name
Annual International Conference on Forensic Science – Criminalistics Research (FSCR)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bd562a20-3782-4fe5-825f-dd2ffd84cdae (old id 4091763)
alternative location
http://dl4.globalstf.org/?wpsc-product=stories-after-the-bosnian-war-competition-for-victimhood
date added to LUP
2013-10-14 13:02:23
date last changed
2016-04-16 09:02:45
@misc{bd562a20-3782-4fe5-825f-dd2ffd84cdae,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
The aim of this article is to analyze verbally portrayed experiences of 27 survivors of the 1990’s war in northwestern Bosnia. Focus lies on describing how the interviewees portray the social phenomenon of ”victimhood”, and to analyze discoursive patterns which contribute to constructing the cathegory ”victim”. When, after the war, different actors claim this ”victim” status it sparks a competition for victimhood. Cathegories appear and they are: ”the remainders” those who lived in northwestern Bosnia before, during and after the war; “the fugitives” those who driven into northwestern Bosnia during the war; “the returnees” those who returned after the war and “the diaspora” those who were driven out from northwestern Bosnia and remained in their new country. The competition between these cathegories seems to take place on a symbolic level. All interviewees want to portray themselves as ”ideal victims” but they are all about to loose that status. The returnees and the diaspora are losing status by receiving recognition from the surrounding community and because they have a higher economic status, the remainders are losing status since they are constantly being haunted by war events and the refugees are losing status by being presented as strangers and thus fitting the role of ideal perpetrators. It seems that by reproducing this competition for the victim role, all demarcations, which were played out so skillfully during the war, are kept alive.},
  author       = {Basic, Goran},
  editor       = {Cheng, Lui-Lung},
  keyword      = {crime,victimhood,victim,war,perpetrator,Bosnia,sociology,sociologi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {68--77},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xbf55d58)},
  series       = {Proceedings of the 1st Annual International Conference on Forensic Sciences & Criminalistics Research (FSCR 2013)},
  title        = {Stories after the Bosnian War: Competition for Victimhood},
  year         = {2013},
}