Advanced

Fungi a driving force in normalisation of the terrestrial cabon cycle following the end-cretaceous extinction

Vajda, Vivi LU (2012) In Earth and Life p.811-820
Abstract
Geologists have long recognized the magnitude, abruptness, and the global pattern of

the major biotic turnover across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary approximately

65.5 million years ago. It was associated with one of the most catastrophic

events in the history of life, involving mass mortality in both terrestrial and marine

ecosystems globally; vast amounts of dead biomass covered the Earth’s surface. Of

prime importance are data from distal boundary sites. These reveal much about the

pattern of extinction, whether overprinted or not by local effects such as cratering

and post-impact tsunamis. There are few instructive Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

sequences... (More)
Geologists have long recognized the magnitude, abruptness, and the global pattern of

the major biotic turnover across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary approximately

65.5 million years ago. It was associated with one of the most catastrophic

events in the history of life, involving mass mortality in both terrestrial and marine

ecosystems globally; vast amounts of dead biomass covered the Earth’s surface. Of

prime importance are data from distal boundary sites. These reveal much about the

pattern of extinction, whether overprinted or not by local effects such as cratering

and post-impact tsunamis. There are few instructive Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

sequences in terrestrial settings. Such sites include the western interior of the

USA, Canada, and New Zealand. The pattern of vegetation turnover in these areas is

characterized by a so-called fern-spike: abrupt and marked increase in relative abundance

of fern spores in palynological assemblages. The latest Cretaceous palynofloras

were a rich and diverse mix of angiosperms and gymnosperms with fern, lycophyte,

and moss spores. In New Zealand, the boundary is characterized by total dominance

of fern spores, notably in undisturbed, fine-grained sediments at the Moody Creek

Mine where turnover from the latest Maastrichtian flora consists of a thin fungal layer followed by a step-wise recovery succession of several ground- and tree-fern taxa. Identification of this ‘fungal-spike’ accords with fungi having played an important role in the devastated terrestrial ecosystems. Fungi may even have facilitated

normalization of the global carbon cycle. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cretaceous, paleogene, Maastrichtian, New Zealand, Moody Creek, mass mortality, terrestrial, palynology, fungae, Fern-spike, carbon-cycle normalization
in
Earth and Life
editor
Talent, John A.
pages
811 - 820
publisher
Springer
ISBN
9789048134281
9789048134274
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f7f2935-f56a-470b-bce7-ac10c13f3bf3 (old id 4281184)
alternative location
http://ludwig.lub.lu.se/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cat02271a&AN=atoz.ebs1382533e&site=eds-live&scope=site
date added to LUP
2014-02-03 12:14:37
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:21:46
@misc{1f7f2935-f56a-470b-bce7-ac10c13f3bf3,
  abstract     = {Geologists have long recognized the magnitude, abruptness, and the global pattern of<br/><br>
the major biotic turnover across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary approximately<br/><br>
65.5 million years ago. It was associated with one of the most catastrophic<br/><br>
events in the history of life, involving mass mortality in both terrestrial and marine<br/><br>
ecosystems globally; vast amounts of dead biomass covered the Earth’s surface. Of<br/><br>
prime importance are data from distal boundary sites. These reveal much about the<br/><br>
pattern of extinction, whether overprinted or not by local effects such as cratering<br/><br>
and post-impact tsunamis. There are few instructive Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary<br/><br>
sequences in terrestrial settings. Such sites include the western interior of the<br/><br>
USA, Canada, and New Zealand. The pattern of vegetation turnover in these areas is<br/><br>
characterized by a so-called fern-spike: abrupt and marked increase in relative abundance<br/><br>
of fern spores in palynological assemblages. The latest Cretaceous palynofloras<br/><br>
were a rich and diverse mix of angiosperms and gymnosperms with fern, lycophyte,<br/><br>
and moss spores. In New Zealand, the boundary is characterized by total dominance<br/><br>
of fern spores, notably in undisturbed, fine-grained sediments at the Moody Creek<br/><br>
Mine where turnover from the latest Maastrichtian flora consists of a thin fungal layer followed by a step-wise recovery succession of several ground- and tree-fern taxa. Identification of this ‘fungal-spike’ accords with fungi having played an important role in the devastated terrestrial ecosystems. Fungi may even have facilitated<br/><br>
normalization of the global carbon cycle.},
  author       = {Vajda, Vivi},
  editor       = {Talent, John A.},
  isbn         = {9789048134281},
  keyword      = {cretaceous,paleogene,Maastrichtian,New Zealand,Moody Creek,mass mortality,terrestrial,palynology,fungae,Fern-spike,carbon-cycle normalization},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {811--820},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa793358)},
  series       = {Earth and Life},
  title        = {Fungi a driving force in normalisation of the terrestrial cabon cycle following the end-cretaceous extinction},
  year         = {2012},
}