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George Lindbeck as a Potential Religious Pluralist

Fridlund, Patrik LU (2014) In The Heythrop Journal
Abstract
Interreligious dialogue and conversion are two intriguing components in understanding religion. A reading of George Lindbeck constitutes the starting point for a discussion in this paper. The dominant reading of Lindbeck is that he claims that traditions absorb the world. According to this reading of Lindbeck, religious traditions are isolated, and yet the one with the best capacity to assimilate others’ concerns is the strongest, implying what is often called exclusivism. The contention of this article is that a radically different reading of Lindbeck is possible. Hence, it is not primarily about questioning Lindbeck, but about bringing forth another side of his texts. If grammar, framework and structure, and not propositional first-order... (More)
Interreligious dialogue and conversion are two intriguing components in understanding religion. A reading of George Lindbeck constitutes the starting point for a discussion in this paper. The dominant reading of Lindbeck is that he claims that traditions absorb the world. According to this reading of Lindbeck, religious traditions are isolated, and yet the one with the best capacity to assimilate others’ concerns is the strongest, implying what is often called exclusivism. The contention of this article is that a radically different reading of Lindbeck is possible. Hence, it is not primarily about questioning Lindbeck, but about bringing forth another side of his texts. If grammar, framework and structure, and not propositional first-order ontological contents, take first place, dialogue and conversion may be seen differently. Questions must be raised though. Is it not true that there are always some contents and some substance—even if hidden and masked? (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
dialogue and conversion, George Lindbeck, framework, New Yale School, postliberalism, theory of religion, religious pluralism
in
The Heythrop Journal
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84894691195
DOI
10.1111/heyj.12136
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
c5cc641a-5a22-4294-ba71-e8b03e66ea4a (old id 4586714)
alternative location
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/heyj.12136/abstract
date added to LUP
2014-08-13 11:06:02
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:43:32
@misc{c5cc641a-5a22-4294-ba71-e8b03e66ea4a,
  abstract     = {Interreligious dialogue and conversion are two intriguing components in understanding religion. A reading of George Lindbeck constitutes the starting point for a discussion in this paper. The dominant reading of Lindbeck is that he claims that traditions absorb the world. According to this reading of Lindbeck, religious traditions are isolated, and yet the one with the best capacity to assimilate others’ concerns is the strongest, implying what is often called exclusivism. The contention of this article is that a radically different reading of Lindbeck is possible. Hence, it is not primarily about questioning Lindbeck, but about bringing forth another side of his texts. If grammar, framework and structure, and not propositional first-order ontological contents, take first place, dialogue and conversion may be seen differently. Questions must be raised though. Is it not true that there are always some contents and some substance—even if hidden and masked?},
  author       = {Fridlund, Patrik},
  keyword      = {dialogue and conversion,George Lindbeck,framework,New Yale School,postliberalism,theory of religion,religious pluralism},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x95c9ee8)},
  series       = {The Heythrop Journal},
  title        = {George Lindbeck as a Potential Religious Pluralist},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/heyj.12136},
  year         = {2014},
}