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Requirements and Use of In-service Information in an Engineering Redesign Task: Case Studies from the Aerospace Industry

Jagtap, Santosh LU and Johnson, Aylmer (2010) In Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 61(12). p.2442-2460
Abstract
This paper describes the research stimulated by a fundamental shift that is occurring in the manufacture and marketing of aero engines for commercial and defence purposes, away from the selling of products to the provision of services. This research was undertaken in an aerospace company, which designs and manufactures aero engines and also offers contracts, under which it remains responsible for the maintenance of engines. These contracts allow the company to collect far more data about the in-service performance of their engines than was previously available. This paper aims at identifying what parts of this in-service information are required when components or systems of existing engines need to be redesigned, because they have not... (More)
This paper describes the research stimulated by a fundamental shift that is occurring in the manufacture and marketing of aero engines for commercial and defence purposes, away from the selling of products to the provision of services. This research was undertaken in an aerospace company, which designs and manufactures aero engines and also offers contracts, under which it remains responsible for the maintenance of engines. These contracts allow the company to collect far more data about the in-service performance of their engines than was previously available. This paper aims at identifying what parts of this in-service information are required when components or systems of existing engines need to be redesigned, because they have not performed as expected in service. In addition, this paper aims at understanding how designers use this in-service information in a redesign task. In an attempt to address these aims we analysed five case studies involving redesign of components or systems of an existing engine. The findings show that the in-service information accessed by the designers mainly contains the undesired physical actions (e.g. deterioration mechanisms, deterioration effects, etc.) and the causal chains of these undesired physical actions. We identified a pattern in the designers’ actions regarding the use of these causal chains. The designers have generated several solutions that utilize these causal chains seen in the in-service information. The findings provide a sound basis for developing tools and methods to support designers in satisfying their in-service information requirements effectively in a redesign task. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
information types, in-service information, aerospace engineering, knowledge management, redesign, document analysis
in
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
volume
61
issue
12
pages
2442 - 2460
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • Scopus:78449273135
ISSN
1532-2890
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bc07eb24-1b94-4a8f-b8d8-3d4db1c73d54 (old id 5049969)
date added to LUP
2015-02-17 16:20:48
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:54:28
@misc{bc07eb24-1b94-4a8f-b8d8-3d4db1c73d54,
  abstract     = {This paper describes the research stimulated by a fundamental shift that is occurring in the manufacture and marketing of aero engines for commercial and defence purposes, away from the selling of products to the provision of services. This research was undertaken in an aerospace company, which designs and manufactures aero engines and also offers contracts, under which it remains responsible for the maintenance of engines. These contracts allow the company to collect far more data about the in-service performance of their engines than was previously available. This paper aims at identifying what parts of this in-service information are required when components or systems of existing engines need to be redesigned, because they have not performed as expected in service. In addition, this paper aims at understanding how designers use this in-service information in a redesign task. In an attempt to address these aims we analysed five case studies involving redesign of components or systems of an existing engine. The findings show that the in-service information accessed by the designers mainly contains the undesired physical actions (e.g. deterioration mechanisms, deterioration effects, etc.) and the causal chains of these undesired physical actions. We identified a pattern in the designers’ actions regarding the use of these causal chains. The designers have generated several solutions that utilize these causal chains seen in the in-service information. The findings provide a sound basis for developing tools and methods to support designers in satisfying their in-service information requirements effectively in a redesign task.},
  author       = {Jagtap, Santosh and Johnson, Aylmer},
  issn         = {1532-2890},
  keyword      = {information types,in-service information,aerospace engineering,knowledge management,redesign,document analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2442--2460},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x869aed8)},
  series       = {Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology},
  title        = {Requirements and Use of In-service Information in an Engineering Redesign Task: Case Studies from the Aerospace Industry},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2010},
}