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No Fault Found: The Root Cause

Larsson, Erik LU ; Eklow, Bill; Davidsson, Scott; Aitken, Rob; Jutman, Artur and Lotz, Christophe (2015) IEEE VLSI Test Symposium In IEEE 33rd VLSI Test Symposium (VTS), 2015
Abstract
No Trouble Found (NTF) has been discussed for several years [1]. An NTF occurs when a device fails at the board/system level and that failure cannot be confirm by the component supplier. There are several explanations for why NTFs occur, including: device complexity; inability to create system level hardware/software transactions which uncover hard to find defects; different environments during testing (power, thermal, noise). More recently a new concept, No Fault Found (NFF), has emerged. A NFF represents a defect which cannot be detected by any known means so far. The premise is that at some point the defect will be exposed - most likely at a customer site when the device is in a system. Given that we looking for a defect that we know... (More)
No Trouble Found (NTF) has been discussed for several years [1]. An NTF occurs when a device fails at the board/system level and that failure cannot be confirm by the component supplier. There are several explanations for why NTFs occur, including: device complexity; inability to create system level hardware/software transactions which uncover hard to find defects; different environments during testing (power, thermal, noise). More recently a new concept, No Fault Found (NFF), has emerged. A NFF represents a defect which cannot be detected by any known means so far. The premise is that at some point the defect will be exposed - most likely at a customer site when the device is in a system. Given that we looking for a defect that we know nothing about and are theoretically undetectable it will be interesting to see what the panel has to say about the nature of these defects and how we intend to find them. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
IEEE 33rd VLSI Test Symposium (VTS), 2015
pages
1 pages
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
conference name
IEEE VLSI Test Symposium
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84940399363
ISBN
9781479975983
DOI
10.1109/VTS.2015.7116284
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3646ffb9-2fe1-4f73-8bce-a5cc26a5ea08 (old id 5205504)
date added to LUP
2015-07-29 09:43:37
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:43:49
@misc{3646ffb9-2fe1-4f73-8bce-a5cc26a5ea08,
  abstract     = {No Trouble Found (NTF) has been discussed for several years [1]. An NTF occurs when a device fails at the board/system level and that failure cannot be confirm by the component supplier. There are several explanations for why NTFs occur, including: device complexity; inability to create system level hardware/software transactions which uncover hard to find defects; different environments during testing (power, thermal, noise). More recently a new concept, No Fault Found (NFF), has emerged. A NFF represents a defect which cannot be detected by any known means so far. The premise is that at some point the defect will be exposed - most likely at a customer site when the device is in a system. Given that we looking for a defect that we know nothing about and are theoretically undetectable it will be interesting to see what the panel has to say about the nature of these defects and how we intend to find them.},
  author       = {Larsson, Erik and Eklow, Bill and Davidsson, Scott and Aitken, Rob and Jutman, Artur and Lotz, Christophe},
  isbn         = {9781479975983},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x98e91a8)},
  series       = {IEEE 33rd VLSI Test Symposium (VTS), 2015},
  title        = {No Fault Found: The Root Cause},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/VTS.2015.7116284},
  year         = {2015},
}