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Battleaxes: Home-made, Made to Order or Factory Products?

Olausson, Deborah LU (1998) In Proceedings from the Third Flint Alternatives Conference at Uppsala, Sweden, October 18-20, 1996 p.125-140
Abstract
Many scholars have claimed that the stone battle axes of the Battle Axe Culture were status objects with a social rather than a pratical function. One way of investigating this is to study the context in which the battle axes were manufactured, and by whom. If any object is to serve as a mark of status, it must be possible for someone who wishes to assert his/her superiority over other community members to limit the object’s availability. This limitation may involve a rare raw material, unusual knowledge about its production, time consuming or labour consuming production, etc. My work aims at analysing a number of possible prehistoric status objects, among them the battle axe, in order to ascertain the organisation of the production. This... (More)
Many scholars have claimed that the stone battle axes of the Battle Axe Culture were status objects with a social rather than a pratical function. One way of investigating this is to study the context in which the battle axes were manufactured, and by whom. If any object is to serve as a mark of status, it must be possible for someone who wishes to assert his/her superiority over other community members to limit the object’s availability. This limitation may involve a rare raw material, unusual knowledge about its production, time consuming or labour consuming production, etc. My work aims at analysing a number of possible prehistoric status objects, among them the battle axe, in order to ascertain the organisation of the production. This may in turn be related to the organisation of society (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
prestige-goods, Neolithic battle axes, craft specialization, workshop industry, organization of production, stone technology
in
Proceedings from the Third Flint Alternatives Conference at Uppsala, Sweden, October 18-20, 1996
editor
Holm, Lena and Knutsson, Kjel
pages
125 - 140
publisher
Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University
ISBN
91-506-1267-0
project
Handmade. Crafting and social strategies in the Scandinavian Neolithic
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c04c1b1-acb0-4520-b8dc-e658e24ca2df (old id 538942)
date added to LUP
2007-09-24 13:30:11
date last changed
2016-04-16 08:07:31
@misc{2c04c1b1-acb0-4520-b8dc-e658e24ca2df,
  abstract     = {Many scholars have claimed that the stone battle axes of the Battle Axe Culture were status objects with a social rather than a pratical function. One way of investigating this is to study the context in which the battle axes were manufactured, and by whom. If any object is to serve as a mark of status, it must be possible for someone who wishes to assert his/her superiority over other community members to limit the object’s availability. This limitation may involve a rare raw material, unusual knowledge about its production, time consuming or labour consuming production, etc. My work aims at analysing a number of possible prehistoric status objects, among them the battle axe, in order to ascertain the organisation of the production. This may in turn be related to the organisation of society},
  author       = {Olausson, Deborah},
  editor       = {Holm, Lena and Knutsson, Kjel},
  isbn         = {91-506-1267-0},
  keyword      = {prestige-goods,Neolithic battle axes,craft specialization,workshop industry,organization of production,stone technology},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {125--140},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x77cc268)},
  series       = {Proceedings from the Third Flint Alternatives Conference at Uppsala, Sweden, October 18-20, 1996},
  title        = {Battleaxes: Home-made, Made to Order or Factory Products?},
  year         = {1998},
}