Advanced

What moves law? Martti Koskenniemi and transcendence in international law

Noll, Gregor LU (2015) In The Law of International Lawyers
Abstract
In this text, I will attempt to understand the relation between metaphysical assumption and argumentative movement in Martti Koskenniemi’s work. I shall try to elaborate the particular form it takes, and think about the implications of that form along the way.

Koskenniemi rejects the translation of universal justice into the concrete practice of norms and institutions. He works in a radically Pauline tradition of thought. The Pauline tradition explains why he is so popular, while the radical spin explains the scepticism he meets. Karl Barth, the Swiss theologian, once set out an analogy of faith (analogia fidei) as a counterposition to the Catholic analogy of being. It is in hope alone that international lawyers participate in the... (More)
In this text, I will attempt to understand the relation between metaphysical assumption and argumentative movement in Martti Koskenniemi’s work. I shall try to elaborate the particular form it takes, and think about the implications of that form along the way.

Koskenniemi rejects the translation of universal justice into the concrete practice of norms and institutions. He works in a radically Pauline tradition of thought. The Pauline tradition explains why he is so popular, while the radical spin explains the scepticism he meets. Karl Barth, the Swiss theologian, once set out an analogy of faith (analogia fidei) as a counterposition to the Catholic analogy of being. It is in hope alone that international lawyers participate in the coming community. Barth thought theology without religion; Koskenniemi thinks redemption without creation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
public international law, folkrätt
in
The Law of International Lawyers
editor
Werner, Wouter; de Hoon, Mareike and Galan, Alexis
publisher
Cambridge University Press
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3e8e907c-9efe-45e0-96a2-08c6d903cf90 (old id 5424115)
date added to LUP
2015-05-20 09:36:49
date last changed
2016-09-22 13:50:47
@misc{3e8e907c-9efe-45e0-96a2-08c6d903cf90,
  abstract     = {In this text, I will attempt to understand the relation between metaphysical assumption and argumentative movement in Martti Koskenniemi’s work. I shall try to elaborate the particular form it takes, and think about the implications of that form along the way.<br/><br/>Koskenniemi rejects the translation of universal justice into the concrete practice of norms and institutions. He works in a radically Pauline tradition of thought. The Pauline tradition explains why he is so popular, while the radical spin explains the scepticism he meets. Karl Barth, the Swiss theologian, once set out an analogy of faith (analogia fidei) as a counterposition to the Catholic analogy of being. It is in hope alone that international lawyers participate in the coming community. Barth thought theology without religion; Koskenniemi thinks redemption without creation.},
  author       = {Noll, Gregor},
  editor       = {Werner, Wouter and de Hoon, Mareike and Galan, Alexis},
  keyword      = {public international law,folkrätt},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xdbde818)},
  series       = {The Law of International Lawyers},
  title        = {What moves law? Martti Koskenniemi and transcendence in international law},
  year         = {2015},
}