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Interlaboratory tests on thermal foot models

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Holmér, Ingvar LU ; Anttonen, Hannu; Burke, Rick; Doughty, Peter; Endrusick, Thomas; Hellsten, Mari; Shen, Yuhong and Uedelhoven, Wolfgang (2005) 10th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics In Environmental Ergonomics - The Ergonomics of Human Comfort, Health, and Performance in the Thermal Environment (Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series) 3. p.449-457
Abstract
A limited Round Robin test has been carried out with different types of foot models. Eight laboratories carried out the tests. The foot models varied in sizes from 254 to 275 mm, representing boot sizes from 41 to 44. Tests with both a bare foot and sock were carried out at about +20 °C and 50% RH. The boots, a thin rubber and a winter boot, were tested at about +5 °C and 85% RH. The conditioning was done at 20 +/- 2 °C and 35 +/- 5% RH. Air velocity was kept low (,0.3 m/s). Wet tests included simulation of sweating by supplying water to the foot skin at a rate of 5 g/h/foot. Relatively big inter-laboratory differences in measuring results were obtained. The differences were smaller for total insulation values but could be over 30% for... (More)
A limited Round Robin test has been carried out with different types of foot models. Eight laboratories carried out the tests. The foot models varied in sizes from 254 to 275 mm, representing boot sizes from 41 to 44. Tests with both a bare foot and sock were carried out at about +20 °C and 50% RH. The boots, a thin rubber and a winter boot, were tested at about +5 °C and 85% RH. The conditioning was done at 20 +/- 2 °C and 35 +/- 5% RH. Air velocity was kept low (,0.3 m/s). Wet tests included simulation of sweating by supplying water to the foot skin at a rate of 5 g/h/foot. Relatively big inter-laboratory differences in measuring results were obtained. The differences were smaller for total insulation values but could be over 30% for local zones. More elaborate comparative tests under different conditions and with more types of footwear need to be done. The effects of differences due to model construction, etc., should be analysed further. For standard use it is important to determine which zones should be included in the total insulation calculation and which zones should be reported separately, e.g. sole area. The foot construction, and the conditions, measurements and calculations for wet tests should be more clearly defined. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Moisture absorption, Thermal foot model, Standard test method, Sweating simulation, Cold protection, Insulation, Moisture transport, Footwear
in
Environmental Ergonomics - The Ergonomics of Human Comfort, Health, and Performance in the Thermal Environment (Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series)
editor
Tochihara, Yutaka and Ohnaka, Tadakatsu
volume
3
pages
449 - 457
publisher
Elsevier
conference name
10th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics
external identifiers
  • WOS:000231046300071
ISBN
0080444660
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ffc29c2a-8c90-4e45-9325-db1cfcac9b99 (old id 592874)
date added to LUP
2008-05-20 13:01:39
date last changed
2016-09-23 15:15:42
@misc{ffc29c2a-8c90-4e45-9325-db1cfcac9b99,
  abstract     = {A limited Round Robin test has been carried out with different types of foot models. Eight laboratories carried out the tests. The foot models varied in sizes from 254 to 275 mm, representing boot sizes from 41 to 44. Tests with both a bare foot and sock were carried out at about +20 °C and 50% RH. The boots, a thin rubber and a winter boot, were tested at about +5 °C and 85% RH. The conditioning was done at 20 +/- 2 °C and 35 +/- 5% RH. Air velocity was kept low (,0.3 m/s). Wet tests included simulation of sweating by supplying water to the foot skin at a rate of 5 g/h/foot. Relatively big inter-laboratory differences in measuring results were obtained. The differences were smaller for total insulation values but could be over 30% for local zones. More elaborate comparative tests under different conditions and with more types of footwear need to be done. The effects of differences due to model construction, etc., should be analysed further. For standard use it is important to determine which zones should be included in the total insulation calculation and which zones should be reported separately, e.g. sole area. The foot construction, and the conditions, measurements and calculations for wet tests should be more clearly defined.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar and Anttonen, Hannu and Burke, Rick and Doughty, Peter and Endrusick, Thomas and Hellsten, Mari and Shen, Yuhong and Uedelhoven, Wolfgang},
  editor       = {Tochihara, Yutaka and Ohnaka, Tadakatsu},
  isbn         = {0080444660},
  keyword      = {Moisture absorption,Thermal foot model,Standard test method,Sweating simulation,Cold protection,Insulation,Moisture transport,Footwear},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {449--457},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8d37578)},
  series       = {Environmental Ergonomics - The Ergonomics of Human Comfort, Health, and Performance in the Thermal Environment (Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series)},
  title        = {Interlaboratory tests on thermal foot models},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2005},
}