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(Un)Conditional surrender? Why do professionals willingly comply with managerialism

Alvesson, Mats LU and Spicer, André (2016) In Journal of Organizational Change Management 29(1). p.1-19
Abstract
Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to explore the question – why do professionals surrender their autonomy? This paper looks at the case of academics, in particular business school academics. It traces how this group of professionals have progressively surrendered their autonomy and complied with the demands of managerialism.

Design/methodology/approach
– This largely theoretical paper looks to develop an understanding of (over)compliance with the bureaucratization of research using the four faces of power – coercive, agenda setting, ideological and discursive.

Findings
– The discussion of this paper argues that the surrendering of autonomy has been reinforced through coercive forms of power like rewards... (More)
Purpose
– The purpose of this paper is to explore the question – why do professionals surrender their autonomy? This paper looks at the case of academics, in particular business school academics. It traces how this group of professionals have progressively surrendered their autonomy and complied with the demands of managerialism.

Design/methodology/approach
– This largely theoretical paper looks to develop an understanding of (over)compliance with the bureaucratization of research using the four faces of power – coercive, agenda setting, ideological and discursive.

Findings
– The discussion of this paper argues that the surrendering of autonomy has been reinforced through coercive forms of power like rewards and punishment and bureaucratization; manipulation and mainstreaming through pushing a particular version of research to the top of the agenda; domination through shaping norms and values; and subjectification through creating new identities.

Originality/value
– The paper explores how academics deal with tensions and paradoxes such as compliance and resistance, as well as love of work and loathing of it. To deal with these paradoxes, academics often treat their work as a game and see themselves as players. While this process enables academics to reconcile themselves with their loss of autonomy, it has troubling collective outcomes: the production of increasing uninteresting and irrelevant research. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Academia, Autonomy, Power, Control
in
Journal of Organizational Change Management
volume
29
issue
1
pages
1 - 19
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84956643407
ISSN
0953-4814
DOI
10.1108/JOCM-11-2015-0221
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
596b58c4-0568-4cd0-be0c-1509172fdf46
date added to LUP
2016-06-29 08:38:51
date last changed
2016-12-04 04:52:33
@misc{596b58c4-0568-4cd0-be0c-1509172fdf46,
  abstract     = {Purpose<br/>– The purpose of this paper is to explore the question – why do professionals surrender their autonomy? This paper looks at the case of academics, in particular business school academics. It traces how this group of professionals have progressively surrendered their autonomy and complied with the demands of managerialism.<br/><br/> Design/methodology/approach<br/> – This largely theoretical paper looks to develop an understanding of (over)compliance with the bureaucratization of research using the four faces of power – coercive, agenda setting, ideological and discursive.<br/><br/>Findings<br/>– The discussion of this paper argues that the surrendering of autonomy has been reinforced through coercive forms of power like rewards and punishment and bureaucratization; manipulation and mainstreaming through pushing a particular version of research to the top of the agenda; domination through shaping norms and values; and subjectification through creating new identities.<br/><br/>Originality/value<br/>– The paper explores how academics deal with tensions and paradoxes such as compliance and resistance, as well as love of work and loathing of it. To deal with these paradoxes, academics often treat their work as a game and see themselves as players. While this process enables academics to reconcile themselves with their loss of autonomy, it has troubling collective outcomes: the production of increasing uninteresting and irrelevant research.},
  author       = {Alvesson, Mats and Spicer, André},
  issn         = {0953-4814},
  keyword      = {Academia,Autonomy,Power,Control},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--19},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x90371e8)},
  series       = {Journal of Organizational Change Management},
  title        = {(Un)Conditional surrender? Why do professionals willingly comply with managerialism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOCM-11-2015-0221},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2016},
}