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From Roots to Routes: Tropes for trippers

Friedman, Jonathan LU (2002) In Anthropological Theory 2(1). p.21-36
Abstract
This article suggests that the current discourses of globalization in anthropology,

cultural studies and post-colonial studies are expressions and elaborations on a specific

socially positioned perspective that has become a contender for a new ideological

representation of the world. It is important to recognize that this representation is not

so much the result of research but an immediate expression of a particular experience,

one that began, in fact, outside of academia. This discourse, which is strongly

evolutionist, is contrasted to a global systemic perspective in which globalization is a

specific historical phase of such systems, a phenomenon that has occurred... (More)
This article suggests that the current discourses of globalization in anthropology,

cultural studies and post-colonial studies are expressions and elaborations on a specific

socially positioned perspective that has become a contender for a new ideological

representation of the world. It is important to recognize that this representation is not

so much the result of research but an immediate expression of a particular experience,

one that began, in fact, outside of academia. This discourse, which is strongly

evolutionist, is contrasted to a global systemic perspective in which globalization is a

specific historical phase of such systems, a phenomenon that has occurred previously,

most recently at the end of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century

when it produced analogous discourses on the global.This article suggests that the current discourses of globalization in anthropology,

cultural studies and post-colonial studies are expressions and elaborations on a specific

socially positioned perspective that has become a contender for a new ideological

representation of the world. It is important to recognize that this representation is not

so much the result of research but an immediate expression of a particular experience,

one that began, in fact, outside of academia. This discourse, which is strongly

evolutionist, is contrasted to a global systemic perspective in which globalization is a

specific historical phase of such systems, a phenomenon that has occurred previously,

most recently at the end of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century

when it produced analogous discourses on the global. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cosmopolitan • culture • essentialism • hybrid • indigenous • roots • routes • transnational
in
Anthropological Theory
volume
2
issue
1
pages
21 - 36
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0346409775
ISSN
1741-2641
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
84597bae-86aa-4929-b697-9bf1934f989d (old id 597610)
date added to LUP
2007-11-21 16:48:57
date last changed
2016-12-04 04:45:43
@misc{84597bae-86aa-4929-b697-9bf1934f989d,
  abstract     = {This article suggests that the current discourses of globalization in anthropology,<br/><br>
cultural studies and post-colonial studies are expressions and elaborations on a specific<br/><br>
socially positioned perspective that has become a contender for a new ideological<br/><br>
representation of the world. It is important to recognize that this representation is not<br/><br>
so much the result of research but an immediate expression of a particular experience,<br/><br>
one that began, in fact, outside of academia. This discourse, which is strongly<br/><br>
evolutionist, is contrasted to a global systemic perspective in which globalization is a<br/><br>
specific historical phase of such systems, a phenomenon that has occurred previously,<br/><br>
most recently at the end of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century<br/><br>
when it produced analogous discourses on the global.This article suggests that the current discourses of globalization in anthropology,<br/><br>
cultural studies and post-colonial studies are expressions and elaborations on a specific<br/><br>
socially positioned perspective that has become a contender for a new ideological<br/><br>
representation of the world. It is important to recognize that this representation is not<br/><br>
so much the result of research but an immediate expression of a particular experience,<br/><br>
one that began, in fact, outside of academia. This discourse, which is strongly<br/><br>
evolutionist, is contrasted to a global systemic perspective in which globalization is a<br/><br>
specific historical phase of such systems, a phenomenon that has occurred previously,<br/><br>
most recently at the end of the 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century<br/><br>
when it produced analogous discourses on the global.},
  author       = {Friedman, Jonathan},
  issn         = {1741-2641},
  keyword      = {cosmopolitan • culture • essentialism • hybrid • indigenous • roots • routes •
transnational},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {21--36},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xaa1ea08)},
  series       = {Anthropological Theory},
  title        = {From Roots to Routes: Tropes for trippers},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2002},
}