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Transferring technology to developing countries

(2004)
Abstract
In 2003/2004 the Masters of European Affairs Programme looked at IPRs and the relationship between developed and developing countries as it pertained to technology transfer, and specifically the TRIPS Agreement.

They addressed three crucial issues: Can the rules on international exhaustion of IPR provide the means to transfer essential medicines to developing countries? Having determined that exhaustion was not the answer, the masters looked at possibilities of compulsory licensing in emergency situations, and how it has been exercised by developing countries. Included is a section looking at the treatment of indigenous peoples and their traditional knowledge and the biological and genetic resources. Finally the question how the... (More)
In 2003/2004 the Masters of European Affairs Programme looked at IPRs and the relationship between developed and developing countries as it pertained to technology transfer, and specifically the TRIPS Agreement.

They addressed three crucial issues: Can the rules on international exhaustion of IPR provide the means to transfer essential medicines to developing countries? Having determined that exhaustion was not the answer, the masters looked at possibilities of compulsory licensing in emergency situations, and how it has been exercised by developing countries. Included is a section looking at the treatment of indigenous peoples and their traditional knowledge and the biological and genetic resources. Finally the question how the 1992 Convention on biological diversity is related to the TRIPS agreement and a closer look at how disputes under the WTO settlement system are resolved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
keywords
private law: intellectual property law, civilrätt: immaterialrätt, developed/developing countries, international exhaustion, essential medicines, compulsory licensing, indigenous people, traditional knowledge, biological and genetic resources
editor
Lidgard, Hans Henrik LU ; Snyder, Kathleen M.; Skude Rasmussen, Jacob; Welling, Snorre and Linder, Tobias
pages
255 pages
publisher
[Publisher information missing]
ISBN
9197543705
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fc5b21d2-8df4-4488-af0c-41491a073ce1 (old id 631640)
date added to LUP
2008-01-25 21:55:11
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:44:14
@misc{fc5b21d2-8df4-4488-af0c-41491a073ce1,
  abstract     = {In 2003/2004 the Masters of European Affairs Programme looked at IPRs and the relationship between developed and developing countries as it pertained to technology transfer, and specifically the TRIPS Agreement.<br/><br>
They addressed three crucial issues: Can the rules on international exhaustion of IPR provide the means to transfer essential medicines to developing countries? Having determined that exhaustion was not the answer, the masters looked at possibilities of compulsory licensing in emergency situations, and how it has been exercised by developing countries. Included is a section looking at the treatment of indigenous peoples and their traditional knowledge and the biological and genetic resources. Finally the question how the 1992 Convention on biological diversity is related to the TRIPS agreement and a closer look at how disputes under the WTO settlement system are resolved.},
  editor       = {Lidgard, Hans Henrik and Snyder, Kathleen M. and Skude Rasmussen, Jacob and Welling, Snorre and Linder, Tobias},
  isbn         = {9197543705},
  keyword      = {private law: intellectual property law,civilrätt: immaterialrätt,developed/developing countries,international exhaustion,essential medicines,compulsory licensing,indigenous people,traditional knowledge,biological and genetic resources},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {255},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9a144c8)},
  title        = {Transferring technology to developing countries},
  year         = {2004},
}