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Living the neurochemical self? : Experiences after the success of the SSRIs

Sandell, Kerstin LU (2016) In Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory 17(2). p.130-148
Abstract (Swedish)
This is an exploration, in dialogue with Nikolas Rose’s
conceptualization of the neurochemical self, of how people taking
antidepressants through in-depth interviews make sense of their
experiences of using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The
neurochemical self, according to Rose, is a self understood as
regulated by neurochemical processes, where how we feel is
mapped onto the body, more precisely the brain. The findings
suggest that one of Rose’s points – that the deep inner self
informed by psychoanalysis is gone – has some bearing. However,
the plasticity of the biological that Rose argues accompanies a
neurochemical understanding that cannot be traced; rather, the
understanding of... (More)
This is an exploration, in dialogue with Nikolas Rose’s
conceptualization of the neurochemical self, of how people taking
antidepressants through in-depth interviews make sense of their
experiences of using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The
neurochemical self, according to Rose, is a self understood as
regulated by neurochemical processes, where how we feel is
mapped onto the body, more precisely the brain. The findings
suggest that one of Rose’s points – that the deep inner self
informed by psychoanalysis is gone – has some bearing. However,
the plasticity of the biological that Rose argues accompanies a
neurochemical understanding that cannot be traced; rather, the
understanding of depression is gravitating towards it being a
biological, constitutional malfunctioning. Adding to this, even
though the users experienced that the pills worked, their
understandings bore no relation to the wider neurochemical
framework and were riddled with uncertainty. As a conclusion it is
suggested that depression is delinked from explanation, and
exists in a void abandoned to containment by medicine, although
not that effectively treated. In this, the only way to become a
functioning subject once again seems to be to go on pills. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Antidepressant use; experiences; neurochemical self; depression; Nikolas Rose; SSRI
in
Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory
volume
17
issue
2
pages
19 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84984621730
ISSN
1600-910X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a362ea0-abca-477f-b984-e64abd1f7c35
date added to LUP
2016-09-22 09:54:22
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:14:03
@misc{6a362ea0-abca-477f-b984-e64abd1f7c35,
  abstract     = {This is an exploration, in dialogue with Nikolas Rose’s<br/>conceptualization of the neurochemical self, of how people taking<br/>antidepressants through in-depth interviews make sense of their<br/>experiences of using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The<br/>neurochemical self, according to Rose, is a self understood as<br/>regulated by neurochemical processes, where how we feel is<br/>mapped onto the body, more precisely the brain. The findings<br/>suggest that one of Rose’s points – that the deep inner self<br/>informed by psychoanalysis is gone – has some bearing. However,<br/>the plasticity of the biological that Rose argues accompanies a<br/>neurochemical understanding that cannot be traced; rather, the<br/>understanding of depression is gravitating towards it being a<br/>biological, constitutional malfunctioning. Adding to this, even<br/>though the users experienced that the pills worked, their<br/>understandings bore no relation to the wider neurochemical<br/>framework and were riddled with uncertainty. As a conclusion it is<br/>suggested that depression is delinked from explanation, and<br/>exists in a void abandoned to containment by medicine, although<br/>not that effectively treated. In this, the only way to become a<br/>functioning subject once again seems to be to go on pills.},
  author       = {Sandell, Kerstin},
  issn         = {1600-910X},
  keyword      = {Antidepressant use; experiences; neurochemical self; depression; Nikolas Rose; SSRI},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {130--148},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8279938)},
  series       = {Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory},
  title        = {Living the neurochemical self? : Experiences after the success of the SSRIs},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2016},
}