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Two-dimensional imaging of glyoxal (C2H2O2) in acetylene flames using laser-induced fluorescence

Tichy, F. E.; Bjørge, T.; Magnussen, B. F.; Bengtsson, P. E. LU and Mauss, F. LU (1998) In Applied Physics B 66(1). p.115-119
Abstract

Laser-induced fluorescence measurements have been performed in turbulent non-premixed flames close to the lift-off point and in laminar premixed acetylene flames. The spectrally analyzed fluorescence signal showed good correspondence to known spectra from glyoxal (C2H2O2). Laser-induced fluorescence spectra from glyoxal vapor using the same excitation wavelength of 428 nm showed the same strongest lines as the signal from the flame. Glyoxal was visualized in two different modes; two-dimensional imaging and a spatial-spectral mode where spectra were obtained at different spatial positions in the flame simultaneously. For the premixed laminar rich flame it is shown that glyoxal is produced early in the... (More)

Laser-induced fluorescence measurements have been performed in turbulent non-premixed flames close to the lift-off point and in laminar premixed acetylene flames. The spectrally analyzed fluorescence signal showed good correspondence to known spectra from glyoxal (C2H2O2). Laser-induced fluorescence spectra from glyoxal vapor using the same excitation wavelength of 428 nm showed the same strongest lines as the signal from the flame. Glyoxal was visualized in two different modes; two-dimensional imaging and a spatial-spectral mode where spectra were obtained at different spatial positions in the flame simultaneously. For the premixed laminar rich flame it is shown that glyoxal is produced early in the flame, before the signals for C2 and CH appear. For the turbulent non-premixed flames it is shown that glyoxal is produced in a layer on the fuel rich side of the flames. Here the fuel is premixed with ambient air. This layer is thin and has a high spatial resolution. The general trend was that the glyoxal signal appeared in regions with a lower temperature compared with the emission from C2 and CH. The imaging of glyoxal in turbulent acetylene flames is a promising tool for achieving new insight into flame phenomena, as it gives very good structural information on the flame front. Tests so far do not indicate that the detected glyoxal is a result of photo-production. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of glyoxal in flames using laser-induced fluorescence. © Springer-Verlag 1998.

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publication status
published
in
Applied Physics B
volume
66
issue
1
pages
5 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0031677881
ISSN
0946-2171
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
73120922-62c8-407c-9345-71211b076cf5
date added to LUP
2016-06-29 17:37:14
date last changed
2016-07-27 09:01:56
@misc{73120922-62c8-407c-9345-71211b076cf5,
  abstract     = {<p>Laser-induced fluorescence measurements have been performed in turbulent non-premixed flames close to the lift-off point and in laminar premixed acetylene flames. The spectrally analyzed fluorescence signal showed good correspondence to known spectra from glyoxal (C<sub>2</sub>H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>). Laser-induced fluorescence spectra from glyoxal vapor using the same excitation wavelength of 428 nm showed the same strongest lines as the signal from the flame. Glyoxal was visualized in two different modes; two-dimensional imaging and a spatial-spectral mode where spectra were obtained at different spatial positions in the flame simultaneously. For the premixed laminar rich flame it is shown that glyoxal is produced early in the flame, before the signals for C<sub>2</sub> and CH appear. For the turbulent non-premixed flames it is shown that glyoxal is produced in a layer on the fuel rich side of the flames. Here the fuel is premixed with ambient air. This layer is thin and has a high spatial resolution. The general trend was that the glyoxal signal appeared in regions with a lower temperature compared with the emission from C<sub>2</sub> and CH. The imaging of glyoxal in turbulent acetylene flames is a promising tool for achieving new insight into flame phenomena, as it gives very good structural information on the flame front. Tests so far do not indicate that the detected glyoxal is a result of photo-production. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of glyoxal in flames using laser-induced fluorescence. © Springer-Verlag 1998.</p>},
  author       = {Tichy, F. E. and Bjørge, T. and Magnussen, B. F. and Bengtsson, P. E. and Mauss, F.},
  issn         = {0946-2171},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {115--119},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xc7abdc0)},
  series       = {Applied Physics B},
  title        = {Two-dimensional imaging of glyoxal (C<sub>2</sub>H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>) in acetylene flames using laser-induced fluorescence},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {1998},
}