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Identification of Possible Weakness Zones in Limestone Bedrock by Resistivity and Induced Polarization

Johansson, Sara LU ; Sparrenbom, Charlotte LU and Dahlin, Torleif LU (2015) Near Surface Geoscience 2015 - 21st European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
In connection to an environmental investigation of a former industrial site, the cretaceous sandy limestone bedrock in the surrounding area were mapped with resistivity and time domain induced polarization (DCIP). The aim of the DCIP survey was to delineate geological units and possible preferential pathways of DNAPL contaminated groundwater. Although IP anomalies corresponding to fractured crystalline bedrock have been observed previously and are commonly interpreted as results of clay weathering, there are not many studies of the IP behavior of limestone in previous research. In contrast to silicates, the weathering of calcite minerals in pure limestone results only in dissolution, without any weathering products in form of minerals. In... (More)
In connection to an environmental investigation of a former industrial site, the cretaceous sandy limestone bedrock in the surrounding area were mapped with resistivity and time domain induced polarization (DCIP). The aim of the DCIP survey was to delineate geological units and possible preferential pathways of DNAPL contaminated groundwater. Although IP anomalies corresponding to fractured crystalline bedrock have been observed previously and are commonly interpreted as results of clay weathering, there are not many studies of the IP behavior of limestone in previous research. In contrast to silicates, the weathering of calcite minerals in pure limestone results only in dissolution, without any weathering products in form of minerals. In this study, varying resistivity values and large IP anomalies were found in the sandy limestone bedrock, which are probable indications of weakness zones. The observed strong IP anomalies may be caused by calcite dissolution and precipitation processes or by clay mineral precipitation from chemical weathering of the silica grains contained in the sandy limestone. Another possibility may be sporadic presence of glauconitic sand in the limestone. More research is needed to confirm the sources of the observed anomalies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
[Host publication title missing]
pages
5 pages
publisher
European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers
conference name
Near Surface Geoscience 2015 - 21st European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84958046725
DOI
10.3997/2214-4609.201413756
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b5bdea8-6fbd-4bf8-8050-50885543206b (old id 7867622)
date added to LUP
2015-09-16 08:58:38
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:51:11
@misc{1b5bdea8-6fbd-4bf8-8050-50885543206b,
  abstract     = {In connection to an environmental investigation of a former industrial site, the cretaceous sandy limestone bedrock in the surrounding area were mapped with resistivity and time domain induced polarization (DCIP). The aim of the DCIP survey was to delineate geological units and possible preferential pathways of DNAPL contaminated groundwater. Although IP anomalies corresponding to fractured crystalline bedrock have been observed previously and are commonly interpreted as results of clay weathering, there are not many studies of the IP behavior of limestone in previous research. In contrast to silicates, the weathering of calcite minerals in pure limestone results only in dissolution, without any weathering products in form of minerals. In this study, varying resistivity values and large IP anomalies were found in the sandy limestone bedrock, which are probable indications of weakness zones. The observed strong IP anomalies may be caused by calcite dissolution and precipitation processes or by clay mineral precipitation from chemical weathering of the silica grains contained in the sandy limestone. Another possibility may be sporadic presence of glauconitic sand in the limestone. More research is needed to confirm the sources of the observed anomalies.},
  author       = {Johansson, Sara and Sparrenbom, Charlotte and Dahlin, Torleif},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {5},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xbb4a9a8)},
  series       = {[Host publication title missing]},
  title        = {Identification of Possible Weakness Zones in Limestone Bedrock by Resistivity and Induced Polarization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3997/2214-4609.201413756},
  year         = {2015},
}