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Localization of DNA damage by current exchanging repair enzymes:

Eriksen, Kasper LU (2005) In Theoretical Biology Medical Modelling 2(1). p.15-15
Abstract
Background



How DNA repair enzymes find the relatively rare sites of damage is not known in great detail. Recent experiments and molecular data suggest that individual repair enzymes do not work independently of each other, but interact with each other through charges exchanged along the DNA. A damaged site in the DNA hinders this exchange. The hypothesis is that the charge exchange quickly liberates the repair enzymes from error-free stretches of DNA. In this way, the sites of damage are located more quickly; but how much more quickly is not known, nor is it known whether the charge exchange mechanism has other observable consequences.



Results



Here the size of the speed-up gained... (More)
Background



How DNA repair enzymes find the relatively rare sites of damage is not known in great detail. Recent experiments and molecular data suggest that individual repair enzymes do not work independently of each other, but interact with each other through charges exchanged along the DNA. A damaged site in the DNA hinders this exchange. The hypothesis is that the charge exchange quickly liberates the repair enzymes from error-free stretches of DNA. In this way, the sites of damage are located more quickly; but how much more quickly is not known, nor is it known whether the charge exchange mechanism has other observable consequences.



Results



Here the size of the speed-up gained from this charge exchange mechanism is calculated and the characteristic length and time scales are identified. In particular, for Escherichia coli, I estimate the speed-up is 50000/N, where N is the number of repair enzymes participating in the charge exchange mechanism. Even though N is not exactly known, a speed-up of order 10 is not entirely unreasonable. Furthermore, upon over expression of all the repair enzymes, the location time only varies as N-1/2 and not as 1/N.



Conclusion



The revolutionary hypothesis that DNA repair enzymes use charge exchange along DNA to locate damaged sites more efficiently is actually sound from a purely theoretical point of view. Furthermore, the predicted collective behavior of the location time is important in assessing the impact of stress-ful and radioactive environments on individual cell mutation rates. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Theoretical Biology Medical Modelling
volume
2
issue
1
pages
15 - 15
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • WOS:000208054700015
  • Scopus:21544446371
ISSN
1742-4682
DOI
10.1186/1742-4682-2-15
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
15cbe8ac-adf4-4f5c-b216-9b76f6c9c51a (old id 796373)
date added to LUP
2007-12-28 00:17:14
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:29:33
@misc{15cbe8ac-adf4-4f5c-b216-9b76f6c9c51a,
  abstract     = {Background<br/><br>
<br/><br>
How DNA repair enzymes find the relatively rare sites of damage is not known in great detail. Recent experiments and molecular data suggest that individual repair enzymes do not work independently of each other, but interact with each other through charges exchanged along the DNA. A damaged site in the DNA hinders this exchange. The hypothesis is that the charge exchange quickly liberates the repair enzymes from error-free stretches of DNA. In this way, the sites of damage are located more quickly; but how much more quickly is not known, nor is it known whether the charge exchange mechanism has other observable consequences.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Here the size of the speed-up gained from this charge exchange mechanism is calculated and the characteristic length and time scales are identified. In particular, for Escherichia coli, I estimate the speed-up is 50000/N, where N is the number of repair enzymes participating in the charge exchange mechanism. Even though N is not exactly known, a speed-up of order 10 is not entirely unreasonable. Furthermore, upon over expression of all the repair enzymes, the location time only varies as N-1/2 and not as 1/N.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The revolutionary hypothesis that DNA repair enzymes use charge exchange along DNA to locate damaged sites more efficiently is actually sound from a purely theoretical point of view. Furthermore, the predicted collective behavior of the location time is important in assessing the impact of stress-ful and radioactive environments on individual cell mutation rates.},
  author       = {Eriksen, Kasper},
  issn         = {1742-4682},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15--15},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa73aa98)},
  series       = {Theoretical Biology Medical Modelling},
  title        = {Localization of DNA damage by current exchanging repair enzymes:},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-4682-2-15},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2005},
}