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The role of intersubjectivity in intentional communication

Brinck, Ingar LU (2008) In The Shared Mind: Perspectives on Intersubjectivity
Abstract
The present account explains (i) which elements of the act of nonverbal reference are intersubjective, (ii) which major effects intersubjectivity has on the development of intentional communication and at what stages, and (iii) how intersubjectivity contributes to trigger the general capacity for nonverbal reference in the second year. First, intersubjectivity is analysed in terms of a mutual or individual, dyadic or triadic, sharing of experiences. It is then shown that nonverbal reference presupposes intersubjectivity relative to communicative-intent indicating and referential behaviour, and the modification of previous behaviour in response to communication failure. It is argued that different forms of intersubjectivity entail different... (More)
The present account explains (i) which elements of the act of nonverbal reference are intersubjective, (ii) which major effects intersubjectivity has on the development of intentional communication and at what stages, and (iii) how intersubjectivity contributes to trigger the general capacity for nonverbal reference in the second year. First, intersubjectivity is analysed in terms of a mutual or individual, dyadic or triadic, sharing of experiences. It is then shown that nonverbal reference presupposes intersubjectivity relative to communicative-intent indicating and referential behaviour, and the modification of previous behaviour in response to communication failure. It is argued that different forms of intersubjectivity entail different types of communicative skills. A comprehensive analysis of data on various gaze-related intersubjective behaviour in young infants shows that interaffectivity and interattentionality enable referential skills early in development and together allow for complex behaviour, but also that early referential skills arise by other mechanisms than in nonverbal reference and their functions do not overlap. Reliable and consistent use of nonverbal reference occurs when interaffectivity and interattentionality coalesce with interintentionality, which affords general cognitive skills, and these capacities together permit a decontextualisation of communicative behaviour. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
pragmatics, nonverbal reference, intersubjectivity, intentional communication, pointing, infant communication
in
The Shared Mind: Perspectives on Intersubjectivity
editor
Racine, Tim; Zlatev, Jordan; Sinha, Chris and Itkonen, Esa
publisher
John Benjamins Publishing Company
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
51d3d834-b516-4dd8-b88a-3926d5254479 (old id 810109)
date added to LUP
2008-01-25 08:44:03
date last changed
2016-07-18 21:34:59
@misc{51d3d834-b516-4dd8-b88a-3926d5254479,
  abstract     = {The present account explains (i) which elements of the act of nonverbal reference are intersubjective, (ii) which major effects intersubjectivity has on the development of intentional communication and at what stages, and (iii) how intersubjectivity contributes to trigger the general capacity for nonverbal reference in the second year. First, intersubjectivity is analysed in terms of a mutual or individual, dyadic or triadic, sharing of experiences. It is then shown that nonverbal reference presupposes intersubjectivity relative to communicative-intent indicating and referential behaviour, and the modification of previous behaviour in response to communication failure. It is argued that different forms of intersubjectivity entail different types of communicative skills. A comprehensive analysis of data on various gaze-related intersubjective behaviour in young infants shows that interaffectivity and interattentionality enable referential skills early in development and together allow for complex behaviour, but also that early referential skills arise by other mechanisms than in nonverbal reference and their functions do not overlap. Reliable and consistent use of nonverbal reference occurs when interaffectivity and interattentionality coalesce with interintentionality, which affords general cognitive skills, and these capacities together permit a decontextualisation of communicative behaviour.},
  author       = {Brinck, Ingar},
  editor       = {Racine, Tim and Zlatev, Jordan and Sinha, Chris and Itkonen, Esa},
  keyword      = {pragmatics,nonverbal reference,intersubjectivity,intentional communication,pointing,infant communication},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa745b68)},
  series       = {The Shared Mind: Perspectives on Intersubjectivity},
  title        = {The role of intersubjectivity in intentional communication},
  year         = {2008},
}