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Host and disease factors are associated with cognitive function in European HIV-infected adults prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy

Winston, A; Stöhr, W; Antinori, A; Arenas-Pinto, A; Llibre, J M; Amieva, H; Cabié, A; Williams, I; Di Perri, G and Tellez, M J, et al. (2016) In HIV Medicine 17(6). p.8-471
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Deficits in cognitive function remain prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this European multicentre study was to assess factors associated with cognitive function in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-infected subjects at the time of enrolment in the NEAT 001/Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA (ANRS) 143 study.

METHODS: Prior to starting ART, seven cognitive tests exploring domains including episodic memory, verbal fluency, executive function and psychomotor speed were administered with scores standardized to z-score using the study population sample mean and standard deviation. The primary measure was overall z-score average (NPZ). We assessed associations between baseline factors and test... (More)

OBJECTIVES: Deficits in cognitive function remain prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this European multicentre study was to assess factors associated with cognitive function in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-infected subjects at the time of enrolment in the NEAT 001/Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA (ANRS) 143 study.

METHODS: Prior to starting ART, seven cognitive tests exploring domains including episodic memory, verbal fluency, executive function and psychomotor speed were administered with scores standardized to z-score using the study population sample mean and standard deviation. The primary measure was overall z-score average (NPZ). We assessed associations between baseline factors and test results using multivariable regression models.

RESULTS: Of 283 subjects with baseline cognitive assessments, 90% were male and 12% of black ethnicity. Median (interquartile range) age, years of education, years of known HIV infection, baseline CD4 count and baseline HIV RNA were 39 (31, 47) years, 13 (11, 17) years, 1 (0, 4) years, 344 (279, 410) cells/μL and 4.74 (4.28, 5.14) log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, respectively. Forty per cent were current smokers. Factors significantly associated with poorer overall cognitive performance in multivariable models included older age, shorter duration of education, black ethnicity, lower height, and lower plasma HIV RNA.

CONCLUSIONS: In this large, European-wide, ART-naïve population with relatively preserved immunity and early HIV infection, cognitive function scores at the time of ART initiation were associated with demographic and HIV-disease factors.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
in
HIV Medicine
volume
17
issue
6
pages
8 - 471
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84949844274
ISSN
1468-1293
DOI
10.1111/hiv.12344
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
8850053b-aee4-4ed4-af1f-66367a56f7a9
date added to LUP
2016-05-04 05:27:01
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:07:33
@misc{8850053b-aee4-4ed4-af1f-66367a56f7a9,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: Deficits in cognitive function remain prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this European multicentre study was to assess factors associated with cognitive function in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-infected subjects at the time of enrolment in the NEAT 001/Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA (ANRS) 143 study.</p><p>METHODS: Prior to starting ART, seven cognitive tests exploring domains including episodic memory, verbal fluency, executive function and psychomotor speed were administered with scores standardized to z-score using the study population sample mean and standard deviation. The primary measure was overall z-score average (NPZ). We assessed associations between baseline factors and test results using multivariable regression models.</p><p>RESULTS: Of 283 subjects with baseline cognitive assessments, 90% were male and 12% of black ethnicity. Median (interquartile range) age, years of education, years of known HIV infection, baseline CD4 count and baseline HIV RNA were 39 (31, 47) years, 13 (11, 17) years, 1 (0, 4) years, 344 (279, 410) cells/μL and 4.74 (4.28, 5.14) log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, respectively. Forty per cent were current smokers. Factors significantly associated with poorer overall cognitive performance in multivariable models included older age, shorter duration of education, black ethnicity, lower height, and lower plasma HIV RNA.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: In this large, European-wide, ART-naïve population with relatively preserved immunity and early HIV infection, cognitive function scores at the time of ART initiation were associated with demographic and HIV-disease factors.</p>},
  author       = {Winston, A and Stöhr, W and Antinori, A and Arenas-Pinto, A and Llibre, J M and Amieva, H and Cabié, A and Williams, I and Di Perri, G and Tellez, M J and Rockstroh, J and Babiker, A and Pozniak, A and Raffi, F and Richert, L and , },
  issn         = {1468-1293},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {8--471},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xc21bc70)},
  series       = {HIV Medicine},
  title        = {Host and disease factors are associated with cognitive function in European HIV-infected adults prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hiv.12344},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2016},
}