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Proteoglycans of joint cartilage. Structure, function, turnover and role as markers of joint disease

Lohmander, Stefan LU (1988) In Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology 2(1). p.37-62
Abstract

Joint cartilage consists of cells embedded in a matrix of fibrous collagen within a concentrated water-proteoglycan gel. The integrity of this matrix is crucial for the biomechanical properties of the joint cartilage. The different components of the matrix are synthesized and degraded by the cartilage cells, a process regulated by the amount of mechanical stress applied to the chondrocytes as well as by peptide factors and hormones present in synovial fluid. The proteoglycans are large macromolecules consisting of a protein core to which are attached multiple chains of glycosaminoglycans and oligosaccharides. During normal and pathological turnover, degradation products are released to the synovial fluid and to the circulation. Newly... (More)

Joint cartilage consists of cells embedded in a matrix of fibrous collagen within a concentrated water-proteoglycan gel. The integrity of this matrix is crucial for the biomechanical properties of the joint cartilage. The different components of the matrix are synthesized and degraded by the cartilage cells, a process regulated by the amount of mechanical stress applied to the chondrocytes as well as by peptide factors and hormones present in synovial fluid. The proteoglycans are large macromolecules consisting of a protein core to which are attached multiple chains of glycosaminoglycans and oligosaccharides. During normal and pathological turnover, degradation products are released to the synovial fluid and to the circulation. Newly developed assays allow the sensitive and specific detection of these fragments in joint fluid and serum. Results of experimental and clinical investigations suggest that these assays will be of value in efforts to diagnose, grade and predict the outcome of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. © 1988 Baillière Tindall. All rights reserved.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
joint disease, Proteoglycans
in
Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology
volume
2
issue
1
pages
26 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0023772875
ISSN
0950-3579
DOI
10.1016/S0950-3579(88)80004-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9c054994-0397-446c-8621-9b3ee01d8659
date added to LUP
2016-05-04 13:07:16
date last changed
2016-05-24 12:29:24
@misc{9c054994-0397-446c-8621-9b3ee01d8659,
  abstract     = {<p>Joint cartilage consists of cells embedded in a matrix of fibrous collagen within a concentrated water-proteoglycan gel. The integrity of this matrix is crucial for the biomechanical properties of the joint cartilage. The different components of the matrix are synthesized and degraded by the cartilage cells, a process regulated by the amount of mechanical stress applied to the chondrocytes as well as by peptide factors and hormones present in synovial fluid. The proteoglycans are large macromolecules consisting of a protein core to which are attached multiple chains of glycosaminoglycans and oligosaccharides. During normal and pathological turnover, degradation products are released to the synovial fluid and to the circulation. Newly developed assays allow the sensitive and specific detection of these fragments in joint fluid and serum. Results of experimental and clinical investigations suggest that these assays will be of value in efforts to diagnose, grade and predict the outcome of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. © 1988 Baillière Tindall. All rights reserved.</p>},
  author       = {Lohmander, Stefan},
  issn         = {0950-3579},
  keyword      = {joint disease,Proteoglycans},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {37--62},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb6333e0)},
  series       = {Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology},
  title        = {Proteoglycans of joint cartilage. Structure, function, turnover and role as markers of joint disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0950-3579(88)80004-9},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {1988},
}