Advanced

Effects of shopping centre re-investments and improvements on sales and visit growth

Anselmsson, Johan LU (2016) In Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 32. p.139-150
Abstract
Purpose

Established shopping centres have in recent years experienced increasing competition due to a steady increase in newer and bigger centres as well as online shopping. How could existing centres compete on such terms?
Design/methodology/approach

This analysis is based on interviews with 96 shopping centre managers in charge of malls that existed in 2008 and 2014, about their improvements during a three-year period and the effects on sales and number of visitors from one year before and one year after that period. The investments and improvements are structured and analysed mainly along seven common categories of shopping centre attributes recognised as determinants of customer satisfaction and/or patronage... (More)
Purpose

Established shopping centres have in recent years experienced increasing competition due to a steady increase in newer and bigger centres as well as online shopping. How could existing centres compete on such terms?
Design/methodology/approach

This analysis is based on interviews with 96 shopping centre managers in charge of malls that existed in 2008 and 2014, about their improvements during a three-year period and the effects on sales and number of visitors from one year before and one year after that period. The investments and improvements are structured and analysed mainly along seven common categories of shopping centre attributes recognised as determinants of customer satisfaction and/or patronage behaviour in existing research.
Findings

The results show significant positive relationships between shopping centres' improvements and the growth in sales as well as visit rates. The effects are, however, more significant for sales than visit growth. The forms of investment that yielded the greatest positive effect are improvements in physical dimensions such as access, atmosphere the retail mix. Increased investments in less physical dimensions such as promotions, entertainment, refreshments and service had little or no effect.
Originality/value

Present studies on centre renovations and improvements are merely case studies or studies of single cases, but this study deals with larger number of cases and long-term effects. In contrast to previous research on shopping centres and the role of satisfaction and patronage, with recommend balance between physical and non-physical aspects, this study highlights the importance of physical capital dimensions. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Shopping centre, Shopping mall, Satisfaction, Attractiveness, Patronage
in
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
volume
32
pages
19 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84974657767
ISSN
0969-6989
DOI
10.1016/j.jretconser.2016.06.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae487815-1a20-41dc-9c97-58e13245d24a
date added to LUP
2016-07-05 19:55:49
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:11:23
@misc{ae487815-1a20-41dc-9c97-58e13245d24a,
  abstract     = {Purpose<br/><br/>Established shopping centres have in recent years experienced increasing competition due to a steady increase in newer and bigger centres as well as online shopping. How could existing centres compete on such terms?<br/>Design/methodology/approach<br/><br/>This analysis is based on interviews with 96 shopping centre managers in charge of malls that existed in 2008 and 2014, about their improvements during a three-year period and the effects on sales and number of visitors from one year before and one year after that period. The investments and improvements are structured and analysed mainly along seven common categories of shopping centre attributes recognised as determinants of customer satisfaction and/or patronage behaviour in existing research.<br/>Findings<br/><br/>The results show significant positive relationships between shopping centres' improvements and the growth in sales as well as visit rates. The effects are, however, more significant for sales than visit growth. The forms of investment that yielded the greatest positive effect are improvements in physical dimensions such as access, atmosphere the retail mix. Increased investments in less physical dimensions such as promotions, entertainment, refreshments and service had little or no effect.<br/>Originality/value<br/><br/>Present studies on centre renovations and improvements are merely case studies or studies of single cases, but this study deals with larger number of cases and long-term effects. In contrast to previous research on shopping centres and the role of satisfaction and patronage, with recommend balance between physical and non-physical aspects, this study highlights the importance of physical capital dimensions.},
  author       = {Anselmsson, Johan},
  issn         = {0969-6989},
  keyword      = {Shopping centre,Shopping mall,Satisfaction,Attractiveness,Patronage},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {139--150},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8b91048)},
  series       = {Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services},
  title        = {Effects of shopping centre re-investments and improvements on sales and visit growth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jretconser.2016.06.009},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2016},
}