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Knee osteoarthritis after meniscectomy : Prevalence of radiographic changes after twenty-one years, compared with matched controls

Roos, Harald LU ; Laurén, Mårten LU ; Adalberth, Torsten; Roos, Ewa M. LU ; Jonsson, Kjell LU and Lohmander, L. Stefan LU (1998) In Arthritis and Rheumatism 41(4). p.687-693
Abstract

Objective. To study the long-term outcome of surgical removal of a meniscus in the knee with regard to radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Of the 123 patients who underwent an open meniscectomy due to an isolated meniscus tear in 1973 at Lund University Hospital, 107 were followed up 21 years later by clinical examination and by review of knee radiographs obtained with weight bearing. Seventy-nine of the 107 patients were men, and the mean age of the total study group at examination was 55 years (range 35-77). Sixty-eight sex- and age-matched individuals with healthy knees served as controls. Results. Mild radiographic changes were found in 76 (71%) of the knees, while more advanced changes, comparable with a... (More)

Objective. To study the long-term outcome of surgical removal of a meniscus in the knee with regard to radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Of the 123 patients who underwent an open meniscectomy due to an isolated meniscus tear in 1973 at Lund University Hospital, 107 were followed up 21 years later by clinical examination and by review of knee radiographs obtained with weight bearing. Seventy-nine of the 107 patients were men, and the mean age of the total study group at examination was 55 years (range 35-77). Sixty-eight sex- and age-matched individuals with healthy knees served as controls. Results. Mild radiographic changes were found in 76 (71%) of the knees, while more advanced changes, comparable with a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of 2 or higher, were seen in 51 (48%). The corresponding prevalence values in the control group were 12 (18%) and 5 (7%), respectively. The relative risk for the presence of the more advanced radiographic changes representing definite radiographic tibiofemoral OA was 14.0 (95% confidence interval 3.5-121.2), using age- and sex-matched pairs for comparison. No correlation with sex, localization to compartment, type of meniscus tear, or work load was found. Knee symptoms were reported twice as often in the study group as in the controls. Conclusion. Surgical removal of a meniscus following knee injury represents a significant risk factor for radiographic tibiofemoral OA, with a relative risk of 14.0 after 21 years.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis and Rheumatism
volume
41
issue
4
pages
7 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0031925640
ISSN
0004-3591
DOI
10.1002/1529-0131(199804)41:4<687::AID-ART16>3.0.CO;2-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c447ace2-e156-45f5-992a-190d9736cd14
date added to LUP
2016-05-04 23:59:54
date last changed
2016-11-27 04:40:08
@misc{c447ace2-e156-45f5-992a-190d9736cd14,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective. To study the long-term outcome of surgical removal of a meniscus in the knee with regard to radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Of the 123 patients who underwent an open meniscectomy due to an isolated meniscus tear in 1973 at Lund University Hospital, 107 were followed up 21 years later by clinical examination and by review of knee radiographs obtained with weight bearing. Seventy-nine of the 107 patients were men, and the mean age of the total study group at examination was 55 years (range 35-77). Sixty-eight sex- and age-matched individuals with healthy knees served as controls. Results. Mild radiographic changes were found in 76 (71%) of the knees, while more advanced changes, comparable with a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of 2 or higher, were seen in 51 (48%). The corresponding prevalence values in the control group were 12 (18%) and 5 (7%), respectively. The relative risk for the presence of the more advanced radiographic changes representing definite radiographic tibiofemoral OA was 14.0 (95% confidence interval 3.5-121.2), using age- and sex-matched pairs for comparison. No correlation with sex, localization to compartment, type of meniscus tear, or work load was found. Knee symptoms were reported twice as often in the study group as in the controls. Conclusion. Surgical removal of a meniscus following knee injury represents a significant risk factor for radiographic tibiofemoral OA, with a relative risk of 14.0 after 21 years.</p>},
  author       = {Roos, Harald and Laurén, Mårten and Adalberth, Torsten and Roos, Ewa M. and Jonsson, Kjell and Lohmander, L. Stefan},
  issn         = {0004-3591},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {687--693},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb677ba0)},
  series       = {Arthritis and Rheumatism},
  title        = {Knee osteoarthritis after meniscectomy : Prevalence of radiographic changes after twenty-one years, compared with matched controls},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1529-0131(199804)41:4<687::AID-ART16>3.0.CO;2-2},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {1998},
}