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Analysis of pre-hospital rescue times on mortality in trauma patients in a Scandinavian urban setting

MOHAMMAD BAGHER, ALI LU ; Todorova, Lizbet LU ; Andersson, Lina; Wingren, Carl Johan LU ; Ottosson, Anders LU ; Wangefjord, Sakarias LU and Acosta, Stefan LU (2016) In Trauma
Abstract (Swedish)
Objective: To analyze if pre-hospital rescue times were associated with mortality in a trauma cohort arriving by ambulance to hospital in a Scandinavian urban setting. Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, individuals and pre-hospital rescue times were identified in Emergency Medical Dispatcher Centre, hospital, and forensic records in red alarm trauma. Major trauma was defined as a New Injury
Severity Score (NISS)>15. Results: Overall, 89% of 378 trauma patients received hospital care within 60 min; 51% had a response time of 8 min, and 95% had response time within 20 min. The on-scene time (p<0.05) and total pre-hospital time (p<0.05) were longer for patients 65 years, in comparison with patients <65 years. The patients with... (More)
Objective: To analyze if pre-hospital rescue times were associated with mortality in a trauma cohort arriving by ambulance to hospital in a Scandinavian urban setting. Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, individuals and pre-hospital rescue times were identified in Emergency Medical Dispatcher Centre, hospital, and forensic records in red alarm trauma. Major trauma was defined as a New Injury
Severity Score (NISS)>15. Results: Overall, 89% of 378 trauma patients received hospital care within 60 min; 51% had a response time of 8 min, and 95% had response time within 20 min. The on-scene time (p<0.05) and total pre-hospital time (p<0.05) were longer for patients 65 years, in comparison with patients <65 years. The patients with penetrating trauma had shorter on-scene time (p<0.01), total pre-hospital time (p<0.01), and shorter transport distance from trauma scene to hospital (p¼0.004), compared to those with blunt trauma. Patients with NISS>15 were found to have the same pre-hospital rescue times as those with NISS15. There was a trend that the occurrence of gunshots was associated
with increased mortality (p¼0.074). When entering age, NISS, penetrating versus blunt injury, response time, and on-scene time in a multivariate regression analysis, age (p<0.001), NISS (p<0.001), and penetrating injury (p=0.009) remained as independent factors associated with mortality and a trend for shorter on-scene time (p=0.093). Conclusions: Pre-hospital rescue times had less impact on mortality than injury severity, age, and penetrating trauma. Even though penetrating traumas were associated with shorter on-scene time and shorter transport distance to hospital, mortality was increased in this Scandinavian urban setting. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Trauma, prehospital akutsjukvård
in
Trauma
pages
7 pages
publisher
SAGE Publications
ISSN
1460-4086
DOI
10.1177/1460408616649217
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ce398bb7-4202-46c8-b62d-b9627842aeea
date added to LUP
2016-08-12 09:42:19
date last changed
2016-08-15 14:08:30
@misc{ce398bb7-4202-46c8-b62d-b9627842aeea,
  abstract     = {Objective: To analyze if pre-hospital rescue times were associated with mortality in a trauma cohort arriving by ambulance to hospital in a Scandinavian urban setting. Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, individuals and pre-hospital rescue times were identified in Emergency Medical Dispatcher Centre, hospital, and forensic records in red alarm trauma. Major trauma was defined as a New Injury<br>
Severity Score (NISS)&gt;15. Results: Overall, 89% of 378 trauma patients received hospital care within 60 min; 51% had a response time of 8 min, and 95% had response time within 20 min. The on-scene time (p&lt;0.05) and total pre-hospital time (p&lt;0.05) were longer for patients 65 years, in comparison with patients &lt;65 years. The patients with penetrating trauma had shorter on-scene time (p&lt;0.01), total pre-hospital time (p&lt;0.01), and shorter transport distance from trauma scene to hospital (p¼0.004), compared to those with blunt trauma. Patients with NISS&gt;15 were found to have the same pre-hospital rescue times as those with NISS15. There was a trend that the occurrence of gunshots was associated<br>
with increased mortality (p¼0.074). When entering age, NISS, penetrating versus blunt injury, response time, and on-scene time in a multivariate regression analysis, age (p&lt;0.001), NISS (p&lt;0.001), and penetrating injury (p=0.009) remained as independent factors associated with mortality and a trend for shorter on-scene time (p=0.093). Conclusions: Pre-hospital rescue times had less impact on mortality than injury severity, age, and penetrating trauma. Even though penetrating traumas were associated with shorter on-scene time and shorter transport distance to hospital, mortality was increased in this Scandinavian urban setting.},
  author       = {MOHAMMAD BAGHER, ALI and Todorova, Lizbet and Andersson, Lina and Wingren, Carl Johan and Ottosson, Anders and Wangefjord, Sakarias and Acosta, Stefan},
  issn         = {1460-4086},
  keyword      = {Trauma,prehospital akutsjukvård},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  pages        = {7},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8d5f0c0)},
  series       = {Trauma},
  title        = {Analysis of pre-hospital rescue times on mortality in trauma patients in a Scandinavian urban setting},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1460408616649217},
  year         = {2016},
}