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Influence of soil frost on the character and degradability of dissolved organic carbon in boreal forest soils

Panneer Selvam, Balathandayuthabani LU ; Laudon, Hjalmar; Guillemette, Francois and Berggren, Martin LU (2016) In Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences 121(3). p.829-840
Abstract
Recent studies suggest that increases in extent and duration of winter soil frost increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in boreal riparian soils and connected aquatic systems during the subsequent spring and summer. However, little is known about the impact of frost on DOC character and its degradability. We applied three experimental treatments to riparian soils in northern Sweden—shallow soil frost (insulated), deep soil frost (snow removed) and control plots—to test the effect of different soil frost regimes on the chemical characteristics and degradability of soil DOC. Soil pore water samples were analyzed using excitation-emission fluorescence (parallel factor analysis) combined with biological and photochemical... (More)
Recent studies suggest that increases in extent and duration of winter soil frost increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in boreal riparian soils and connected aquatic systems during the subsequent spring and summer. However, little is known about the impact of frost on DOC character and its degradability. We applied three experimental treatments to riparian soils in northern Sweden—shallow soil frost (insulated), deep soil frost (snow removed) and control plots—to test the effect of different soil frost regimes on the chemical characteristics and degradability of soil DOC. Soil pore water samples were analyzed using excitation-emission fluorescence (parallel factor analysis) combined with biological and photochemical degradation experiments. We found that the absolute bacterial metabolic rates were significantly lower in samples from the shallow soil frost treatments, compared with the other treatments. Explorative multivariate analyses indicate that increasing soil frost is contributing to increased protein-like fluorescence and to increased biological degradability of the DOC. Our study shows that decreases in riparian soil frost due to climate warming may not only contribute to decreased riparian DOC concentrations but also lead to shifts in the DOC composition, resulting in decreased biodegradability (yet similar photodegradability) of the DOC that is exported from riparian soils to streams.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences
volume
121
issue
3
pages
829 - 840
publisher
American Geophysical Union
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84961267004
  • WOS:000374345000014
ISSN
2169-8961
DOI
10.1002/2015JG003228
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e16ecb61-13a6-4b11-9242-59358ad1884c
date added to LUP
2016-04-29 13:04:00
date last changed
2016-10-13 05:07:23
@misc{e16ecb61-13a6-4b11-9242-59358ad1884c,
  abstract     = {Recent studies suggest that increases in extent and duration of winter soil frost increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in boreal riparian soils and connected aquatic systems during the subsequent spring and summer. However, little is known about the impact of frost on DOC character and its degradability. We applied three experimental treatments to riparian soils in northern Sweden—shallow soil frost (insulated), deep soil frost (snow removed) and control plots—to test the effect of different soil frost regimes on the chemical characteristics and degradability of soil DOC. Soil pore water samples were analyzed using excitation-emission fluorescence (parallel factor analysis) combined with biological and photochemical degradation experiments. We found that the absolute bacterial metabolic rates were significantly lower in samples from the shallow soil frost treatments, compared with the other treatments. Explorative multivariate analyses indicate that increasing soil frost is contributing to increased protein-like fluorescence and to increased biological degradability of the DOC. Our study shows that decreases in riparian soil frost due to climate warming may not only contribute to decreased riparian DOC concentrations but also lead to shifts in the DOC composition, resulting in decreased biodegradability (yet similar photodegradability) of the DOC that is exported from riparian soils to streams.<br/>},
  author       = {Panneer Selvam, Balathandayuthabani and Laudon, Hjalmar and Guillemette, Francois and Berggren, Martin},
  issn         = {2169-8961},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {829--840},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xb15cc58)},
  series       = {Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences},
  title        = {Influence of soil frost on the character and degradability of dissolved organic carbon in boreal forest soils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JG003228},
  volume       = {121},
  year         = {2016},
}