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Perceptions of diabetes control among people with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom

Brod, Meryl; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Berntorp, Kerstin LU ; Vilsbøll, Tina and Weissenberger, Benno (2016) In Current Medical Research and Opinion p.1-9
Abstract

Objective: To investigate perceptions of control among people with uncontrolled and well controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin, as well as differences in perceptions and diabetes management practices between the two groups. Research design and methods: Web surveys of 1012 people with uncontrolled T2D (HbA1c >8.0% or 64 mmol/mol) on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK and 295 people with well controlled T2D (HbA1c 1c value (78.9%), times per day insulin taken (78.8%), insulin units taken per day (77.6%), and energy levels (74.5%). Fifty-one percent of uncontrolled respondents considered the past week or more recently when thinking about control. Perceived major obstacles to... (More)

Objective: To investigate perceptions of control among people with uncontrolled and well controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin, as well as differences in perceptions and diabetes management practices between the two groups. Research design and methods: Web surveys of 1012 people with uncontrolled T2D (HbA1c >8.0% or 64 mmol/mol) on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK and 295 people with well controlled T2D (HbA1c 1c value (78.9%), times per day insulin taken (78.8%), insulin units taken per day (77.6%), and energy levels (74.5%). Fifty-one percent of uncontrolled respondents considered the past week or more recently when thinking about control. Perceived major obstacles to control included stress (75.4%), other health issues (70.8%), medicine side effects (69.9%), food cravings (69.8%), doctor not understanding individual situation (67.6%), and life crises (66.9%). Many uncontrolled respondents reported that diabetes was very/extremely interfering with their lives, including energy level (71.0%), performance at work (70.0%), general health (69.9%), and doing what one wants (69.3%). Analyses showed significant differences between well controlled and uncontrolled UK respondents. Compared to the uncontrolled, people with well controlled T2D were significantly more likely to consider the last 24 hours/current time when thinking about control (50% vs. 21%, p 

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
Diabetes control, Diabetes management, Perceptions of control, Type 2 diabetes
in
Current Medical Research and Opinion
pages
9 pages
publisher
LibraPharm
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84978033481
ISSN
0300-7995
DOI
10.1080/03007995.2016.1198311
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e2bd2b7c-32ba-459a-99da-ec57d5b83cfb
date added to LUP
2016-07-25 14:28:29
date last changed
2016-11-14 12:48:19
@misc{e2bd2b7c-32ba-459a-99da-ec57d5b83cfb,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To investigate perceptions of control among people with uncontrolled and well controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin, as well as differences in perceptions and diabetes management practices between the two groups. Research design and methods: Web surveys of 1012 people with uncontrolled T2D (HbA<sub>1c</sub> &gt;8.0% or 64 mmol/mol) on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK and 295 people with well controlled T2D (HbA<sub>1c</sub> 1c value (78.9%), times per day insulin taken (78.8%), insulin units taken per day (77.6%), and energy levels (74.5%). Fifty-one percent of uncontrolled respondents considered the past week or more recently when thinking about control. Perceived major obstacles to control included stress (75.4%), other health issues (70.8%), medicine side effects (69.9%), food cravings (69.8%), doctor not understanding individual situation (67.6%), and life crises (66.9%). Many uncontrolled respondents reported that diabetes was very/extremely interfering with their lives, including energy level (71.0%), performance at work (70.0%), general health (69.9%), and doing what one wants (69.3%). Analyses showed significant differences between well controlled and uncontrolled UK respondents. Compared to the uncontrolled, people with well controlled T2D were significantly more likely to consider the last 24 hours/current time when thinking about control (50% vs. 21%, p </p>},
  author       = {Brod, Meryl and Pfeiffer, Kathryn M. and Barnett, Anthony H. and Berntorp, Kerstin and Vilsbøll, Tina and Weissenberger, Benno},
  issn         = {0300-7995},
  keyword      = {Diabetes control,Diabetes management,Perceptions of control,Type 2 diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  pages        = {1--9},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xcf06850)},
  series       = {Current Medical Research and Opinion},
  title        = {Perceptions of diabetes control among people with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03007995.2016.1198311},
  year         = {2016},
}