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Chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation

Forsberg, Anna LU ; Claësson, Matilda ; Dahlman, Gull-Britt LU and Lennerling, Annette (2017) In Journal of Organ Transplantation 1(1). p.1-12
Abstract
Chronic bodily pain after lung transplantation has received little attention. Therefore, the aim was to provide a multidimensional assessment of self-reported chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation and its relationship with self-reported psychological general well-being (PGWB) and self-efficacy. This multicenter, cross-sectional study is a part of the Swedish national study: Self-management after thoracic transplantation (SMATT). In total, 117 lung transplant recipients, all white, due for their yearly follow-up at one (n=35), two (n=28), three (n=23), four (n=20) or five years (n=11) after transplantation were included. Of these, 113 reported their pain on the Pain-O-Meter (POM), which provides information about pain intensity,... (More)
Chronic bodily pain after lung transplantation has received little attention. Therefore, the aim was to provide a multidimensional assessment of self-reported chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation and its relationship with self-reported psychological general well-being (PGWB) and self-efficacy. This multicenter, cross-sectional study is a part of the Swedish national study: Self-management after thoracic transplantation (SMATT). In total, 117 lung transplant recipients, all white, due for their yearly follow-up at one (n=35), two (n=28), three (n=23), four (n=20) or five years (n=11) after transplantation were included. Of these, 113 reported their pain on the Pain-O-Meter (POM), which provides information about pain intensity, quality, location, and duration. In addition, they responded to the PGWB instrument and the Self-Efficacy instrument for managing chronic disease. The prevalence of pain was 51% after 1 year, 68 % after 2 years, 69.5 % after 3 years, 75 % after 4 years and 54.5 % after 5 years. Women experienced higher pain intensity and worse sensory and affective burden than men. Psychological general well-being was the main factor that contributed to the experience of pain. Better perceived psychological well-being lowered the odds for pain, while higher self-efficacy reduced the probability of experiencing pain. Many of the lung recipients lacked pain treatment and were uncertain about the reasons behind their pain. Chronic bodily pain is a common and serious symptom up to five years after lung transplantation. Female lung recipients experience more pain and pain related illness than men. (Less)
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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Organ Transplantation
volume
1
issue
1
pages
1 - 12
ISSN
2576-9359
DOI
10.14302/issn.2576-9359.jot-17-1570
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01394bb3-6dff-4aca-b82a-69f65324d8ed
date added to LUP
2019-05-30 22:56:03
date last changed
2020-04-16 14:22:47
@article{01394bb3-6dff-4aca-b82a-69f65324d8ed,
  abstract     = {Chronic bodily pain after lung transplantation has received little attention. Therefore, the aim was to provide a multidimensional assessment of self-reported chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation and its relationship with self-reported psychological general well-being (PGWB) and self-efficacy. This multicenter, cross-sectional study is a part of the Swedish national study: Self-management after thoracic transplantation (SMATT). In total, 117 lung transplant recipients, all white, due for their yearly follow-up at one (n=35), two (n=28), three (n=23), four (n=20) or five years (n=11) after transplantation were included. Of these, 113 reported their pain on the Pain-O-Meter (POM), which provides information about pain intensity, quality, location, and duration. In addition, they responded to the PGWB instrument and the Self-Efficacy instrument for managing chronic disease. The prevalence of pain was 51% after 1 year, 68 % after 2 years, 69.5 % after 3 years, 75 % after 4 years and 54.5 % after 5 years. Women experienced higher pain intensity and worse sensory and affective burden than men. Psychological general well-being was the main factor that contributed to the experience of pain. Better perceived psychological well-being lowered the odds for pain, while higher self-efficacy reduced the probability of experiencing pain. Many of the lung recipients lacked pain treatment and were uncertain about the reasons behind their pain. Chronic bodily pain is a common and serious symptom up to five years after lung transplantation. Female lung recipients experience more pain and pain related illness than men.},
  author       = {Forsberg, Anna and Claësson, Matilda and Dahlman, Gull-Britt and Lennerling, Annette},
  issn         = {2576-9359},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--12},
  series       = {Journal of Organ Transplantation},
  title        = {Chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.14302/issn.2576-9359.jot-17-1570},
  doi          = {10.14302/issn.2576-9359.jot-17-1570},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2017},
}