Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Patch Testing With Nickel Sulfate 5.0% Traces Significantly More Contact Allergy Than 2.5% : A Prospective Study Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group

Svedman, Cecilia LU ; Ale, Iris ; Goh, Chee Leok ; Goncalo, Margarida ; Lee, Jun Young ; Ljubojevic Hadžavdić, Suzana ; Matsunaga, Kayoko ; Bach, Rasmus Overgaard ; Pratt, Melanie and Puangpet, Pailin , et al. (2022) In Dermatitis 33(6). p.417-420
Abstract

Background Nickel allergy is the most common contact allergy, and a nickel salt is, therefore, included in most baseline patch test series. In the baseline series of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group and the American Contact Dermatitis Society, nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NSH) in petrolatum at 2.5% is included, whereas NSH at 5.0% is included in many other baseline series, such as the European and Swedish ones. Objective The aim of the study is to investigate whether NSH at 5.0% detects significantly more contact allergy than NSH 2.5% when both preparations are tested simultaneously in consecutive dermatitis patients. Patients and Methods Two thousand two hundred eighty-seven consecutive dermatitis patients were patch... (More)

Background Nickel allergy is the most common contact allergy, and a nickel salt is, therefore, included in most baseline patch test series. In the baseline series of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group and the American Contact Dermatitis Society, nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NSH) in petrolatum at 2.5% is included, whereas NSH at 5.0% is included in many other baseline series, such as the European and Swedish ones. Objective The aim of the study is to investigate whether NSH at 5.0% detects significantly more contact allergy than NSH 2.5% when both preparations are tested simultaneously in consecutive dermatitis patients. Patients and Methods Two thousand two hundred eighty-seven consecutive dermatitis patients were patch tested simultaneously with NSH in petrolatum at 2.5% and 5.0%. The allergy rates were compared for all clinics individually and combined using McNemar test, 2-sided. Results Contact allergy to NSH 5.0% and 2.5% was found in 20.3% and 16.8%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In 6 of 11 clinics, significantly more patients tested positive to the higher NSH concentration. For the 2 clinics in North America combined, significantly more patients tested positive to NSH 5.0%. Conclusions The NSH preparation in the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group baseline patch test series should be considered to be changed from NSH 2.5% (1 mg NSH/cm2) to 5.0% (2 mg NSH/cm2).

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and , et al. (More)
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and (Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dermatitis
volume
33
issue
6
pages
4 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:36125779
  • scopus:85142403454
ISSN
1710-3568
DOI
10.1097/DER.0000000000000935
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0189c5b1-7ceb-46e8-bdc7-0ff2c08647dc
date added to LUP
2022-12-29 09:05:46
date last changed
2024-05-02 18:28:51
@article{0189c5b1-7ceb-46e8-bdc7-0ff2c08647dc,
  abstract     = {{<p>Background Nickel allergy is the most common contact allergy, and a nickel salt is, therefore, included in most baseline patch test series. In the baseline series of the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group and the American Contact Dermatitis Society, nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NSH) in petrolatum at 2.5% is included, whereas NSH at 5.0% is included in many other baseline series, such as the European and Swedish ones. Objective The aim of the study is to investigate whether NSH at 5.0% detects significantly more contact allergy than NSH 2.5% when both preparations are tested simultaneously in consecutive dermatitis patients. Patients and Methods Two thousand two hundred eighty-seven consecutive dermatitis patients were patch tested simultaneously with NSH in petrolatum at 2.5% and 5.0%. The allergy rates were compared for all clinics individually and combined using McNemar test, 2-sided. Results Contact allergy to NSH 5.0% and 2.5% was found in 20.3% and 16.8%, respectively (P &lt; 0.0001). In 6 of 11 clinics, significantly more patients tested positive to the higher NSH concentration. For the 2 clinics in North America combined, significantly more patients tested positive to NSH 5.0%. Conclusions The NSH preparation in the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group baseline patch test series should be considered to be changed from NSH 2.5% (1 mg NSH/cm2) to 5.0% (2 mg NSH/cm2).</p>}},
  author       = {{Svedman, Cecilia and Ale, Iris and Goh, Chee Leok and Goncalo, Margarida and Lee, Jun Young and Ljubojevic Hadžavdić, Suzana and Matsunaga, Kayoko and Bach, Rasmus Overgaard and Pratt, Melanie and Puangpet, Pailin and Sasseville, Denis and Andersen, Klaus E. and Dahlin, Jakob and Suzuki, Kayoko and Yagami, Akiko and Bruze, Magnus}},
  issn         = {{1710-3568}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{11}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{417--420}},
  publisher    = {{Lippincott Williams & Wilkins}},
  series       = {{Dermatitis}},
  title        = {{Patch Testing With Nickel Sulfate 5.0% Traces Significantly More Contact Allergy Than 2.5% : A Prospective Study Within the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000935}},
  doi          = {{10.1097/DER.0000000000000935}},
  volume       = {{33}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}