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Associations of defect mismatch repair genes with prognosis and heredity in sporadic colorectal cancer

Ghanipour, L.; Jirström, K. LU ; Sundström, M.; Glimelius, B and Birgisson, H. LU (2017) In European Journal of Surgical Oncology 43(2). p.311-321
Abstract

Background Microsatellite instability arises due to defect mismatch repair (MMR) and occurs in 10–20% of sporadic colorectal cancer. The purpose was to investigate correlations between defect MMR, prognosis and heredity for colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives. Material and methods Tumour tissues from 318 patients consecutively operated for colorectal cancer were analysed for immunohistochemical expression of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 on tissue microarrays. Information on KRAS and BRAF mutation status was available for selected cases. Results Forty-seven (15%) tumours displayed MSI. No correlation was seen between patients exhibiting MSI in the tumour and heredity (p = 0.789). Patients with proximal colon cancer and MSI had an improved... (More)

Background Microsatellite instability arises due to defect mismatch repair (MMR) and occurs in 10–20% of sporadic colorectal cancer. The purpose was to investigate correlations between defect MMR, prognosis and heredity for colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives. Material and methods Tumour tissues from 318 patients consecutively operated for colorectal cancer were analysed for immunohistochemical expression of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 on tissue microarrays. Information on KRAS and BRAF mutation status was available for selected cases. Results Forty-seven (15%) tumours displayed MSI. No correlation was seen between patients exhibiting MSI in the tumour and heredity (p = 0.789). Patients with proximal colon cancer and MSI had an improved cancer-specific survival (p = 0.006) and prolonged time to recurrence (p = 0.037). In a multivariate analysis including MSI status, gender, CEA, vascular and neural invasion, patients with MSS and proximal colon cancer had an impaired cancer-specific survival compared with patients with MSI (HR, 4.32; CI, 1.46–12.78). The same prognostic information was also seen in distal colon cancer; no recurrences seen in the eight patients with stages II and III distal colon cancer and MSI, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion No correlation between MSI and heredity for colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives was seen. Patients with MSI tumours had improved survival.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colorectal cancer, Heredity, MSI, MSS, Prognosis, TMA
in
European Journal of Surgical Oncology
volume
43
issue
2
pages
311 - 321
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009997402
  • wos:000394072300011
ISSN
0748-7983
DOI
10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01a380fa-b87b-42fd-88e2-f7501e6b3221
date added to LUP
2017-02-03 14:51:35
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:48:03
@article{01a380fa-b87b-42fd-88e2-f7501e6b3221,
  abstract     = {<p>Background Microsatellite instability arises due to defect mismatch repair (MMR) and occurs in 10–20% of sporadic colorectal cancer. The purpose was to investigate correlations between defect MMR, prognosis and heredity for colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives. Material and methods Tumour tissues from 318 patients consecutively operated for colorectal cancer were analysed for immunohistochemical expression of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 on tissue microarrays. Information on KRAS and BRAF mutation status was available for selected cases. Results Forty-seven (15%) tumours displayed MSI. No correlation was seen between patients exhibiting MSI in the tumour and heredity (p = 0.789). Patients with proximal colon cancer and MSI had an improved cancer-specific survival (p = 0.006) and prolonged time to recurrence (p = 0.037). In a multivariate analysis including MSI status, gender, CEA, vascular and neural invasion, patients with MSS and proximal colon cancer had an impaired cancer-specific survival compared with patients with MSI (HR, 4.32; CI, 1.46–12.78). The same prognostic information was also seen in distal colon cancer; no recurrences seen in the eight patients with stages II and III distal colon cancer and MSI, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion No correlation between MSI and heredity for colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives was seen. Patients with MSI tumours had improved survival.</p>},
  author       = {Ghanipour, L. and Jirström, K. and Sundström, M. and Glimelius, B and Birgisson, H.},
  issn         = {0748-7983},
  keyword      = {Colorectal cancer,Heredity,MSI,MSS,Prognosis,TMA},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {311--321},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgical Oncology},
  title        = {Associations of defect mismatch repair genes with prognosis and heredity in sporadic colorectal cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.013},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2017},
}