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Green processes based on the extraction with pressurized fluids to obtain potent antimicrobials from Haematococcus pluvialis microalgae

Santoyo, Susana; Rodríguez-Meizoso, I. LU ; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Jaime, Laura; García-Blairsy Reina, G.; Señorans, Francisco Javier and Ibáñez, Elena (2009) In LWT - Food Science and Technology 42(7). p.1213-1218
Abstract

In the present work, the antimicrobial activity of different pressurized liquid extracts obtained from Haematococcus pluvialis microalga was tested against several microorganisms of importance for the food industry (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger). Extractions were performed with hexane and ethanol at four different temperatures (50, 100, 150 and 200 °C) for 20 min. The results showed that extracts obtained with both solvents (hexane and ethanol) from the green motile cells of the microalgae (green phase) presented a low antimicrobial activity against all the microorganisms tested. However, the antimicrobial activity of the extracts obtained from the red hematocysts without flagella (red... (More)

In the present work, the antimicrobial activity of different pressurized liquid extracts obtained from Haematococcus pluvialis microalga was tested against several microorganisms of importance for the food industry (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger). Extractions were performed with hexane and ethanol at four different temperatures (50, 100, 150 and 200 °C) for 20 min. The results showed that extracts obtained with both solvents (hexane and ethanol) from the green motile cells of the microalgae (green phase) presented a low antimicrobial activity against all the microorganisms tested. However, the antimicrobial activity of the extracts obtained from the red hematocysts without flagella (red phase) was totally different depending on the solvent used for the extraction. Hexane extracts showed an antimicrobial activity quite similar to that obtained with the green microalgae, while the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts was much higher. This fact seems to indicate that compounds related to antimicrobial activity of this microalga are found in higher quantities in the red phase of the microalgae and could be relatively polar compounds. Moreover, ethanol extracts from the red phase obtained at 100 °C presented the highest antimicrobial activity. In order to identify the compounds responsible for the antimicrobial activity, a GC-MS characterization of the extracts obtained with both hexane and ethanol at 100 °C, for Haematococcus pluvialis in the green and red phases was also performed. Therefore, the highest antimicrobial activity of the ethanol extract corresponding to red Haematococcus can be associated with the presence in this extract of short-chain fatty acids, which have been previously described to possess antimicrobial activity.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Antimicrobial activity, Green phase, Haematococcus pluvialis, Microalgae, Pressurized liquid extraction, Red phase
in
LWT - Food Science and Technology
volume
42
issue
7
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:64849102724
ISSN
0023-6438
DOI
10.1016/j.lwt.2009.01.012
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
01fdb8da-321b-4ef4-97cc-995b6cad9047
date added to LUP
2017-04-10 10:33:33
date last changed
2017-11-05 05:16:01
@article{01fdb8da-321b-4ef4-97cc-995b6cad9047,
  abstract     = {<p>In the present work, the antimicrobial activity of different pressurized liquid extracts obtained from Haematococcus pluvialis microalga was tested against several microorganisms of importance for the food industry (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger). Extractions were performed with hexane and ethanol at four different temperatures (50, 100, 150 and 200 °C) for 20 min. The results showed that extracts obtained with both solvents (hexane and ethanol) from the green motile cells of the microalgae (green phase) presented a low antimicrobial activity against all the microorganisms tested. However, the antimicrobial activity of the extracts obtained from the red hematocysts without flagella (red phase) was totally different depending on the solvent used for the extraction. Hexane extracts showed an antimicrobial activity quite similar to that obtained with the green microalgae, while the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts was much higher. This fact seems to indicate that compounds related to antimicrobial activity of this microalga are found in higher quantities in the red phase of the microalgae and could be relatively polar compounds. Moreover, ethanol extracts from the red phase obtained at 100 °C presented the highest antimicrobial activity. In order to identify the compounds responsible for the antimicrobial activity, a GC-MS characterization of the extracts obtained with both hexane and ethanol at 100 °C, for Haematococcus pluvialis in the green and red phases was also performed. Therefore, the highest antimicrobial activity of the ethanol extract corresponding to red Haematococcus can be associated with the presence in this extract of short-chain fatty acids, which have been previously described to possess antimicrobial activity.</p>},
  author       = {Santoyo, Susana and Rodríguez-Meizoso, I. and Cifuentes, Alejandro and Jaime, Laura and García-Blairsy Reina, G. and Señorans, Francisco Javier and Ibáñez, Elena},
  issn         = {0023-6438},
  keyword      = {Antimicrobial activity,Green phase,Haematococcus pluvialis,Microalgae,Pressurized liquid extraction,Red phase},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1213--1218},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {LWT - Food Science and Technology},
  title        = {Green processes based on the extraction with pressurized fluids to obtain potent antimicrobials from Haematococcus pluvialis microalgae},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lwt.2009.01.012},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2009},
}