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Patterns of participation in school-related activities and settings in children with spina bifida

Peny-Dahlstrand, M.; Krumlinde-Sundholm, L. and Gosman-Hedstrom, Gunilla LU (2013) In Disability and Rehabilitation 35(21). p.1821-1827
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate how children with spina bifida (SB) participate in school-related activities and to explore if their motor and process skills in task performance were related to their level of active participation in school. Method: Fifty children from a geographical cohort of children with SB (aged 6-14 years) and their teachers rated the children's frequency of participation in school-related activities using a Swedish adaptation of the Availability and Participation Scale. The teachers also rated each child's level of active participation with the School Function Assessment, part one. Each child's motor and process skills were evaluated with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. The relation between levels of active... (More)
Purpose: To evaluate how children with spina bifida (SB) participate in school-related activities and to explore if their motor and process skills in task performance were related to their level of active participation in school. Method: Fifty children from a geographical cohort of children with SB (aged 6-14 years) and their teachers rated the children's frequency of participation in school-related activities using a Swedish adaptation of the Availability and Participation Scale. The teachers also rated each child's level of active participation with the School Function Assessment, part one. Each child's motor and process skills were evaluated with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. The relation between levels of active participation and motor and process skills was subjected to binary logistic regression analysis. Results: The children participated very frequently in school activities, but their level of active participation was restricted, particularly in the recess/playground setting. There was a highly significant relation between full active participation in most school settings and the children's motor and process skills. Conclusion: Children with SB need support to become more actively involved, particularly in unstructured peer activities. The school staff need to be informed that not only the motor skills but also the process skills have an impact on the children's active participation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lipo-myelomeningocele, motor skills, myelomeningocele, participation, process skill, school, spina bifida
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
35
issue
21
pages
1821 - 1827
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000324765600008
  • scopus:84884565803
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.3109/09638288.2012.758319
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0215694b-63fc-41f4-ba33-cbedb971af1a (old id 4172702)
date added to LUP
2013-12-06 12:33:35
date last changed
2019-02-10 03:15:08
@article{0215694b-63fc-41f4-ba33-cbedb971af1a,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To evaluate how children with spina bifida (SB) participate in school-related activities and to explore if their motor and process skills in task performance were related to their level of active participation in school. Method: Fifty children from a geographical cohort of children with SB (aged 6-14 years) and their teachers rated the children's frequency of participation in school-related activities using a Swedish adaptation of the Availability and Participation Scale. The teachers also rated each child's level of active participation with the School Function Assessment, part one. Each child's motor and process skills were evaluated with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. The relation between levels of active participation and motor and process skills was subjected to binary logistic regression analysis. Results: The children participated very frequently in school activities, but their level of active participation was restricted, particularly in the recess/playground setting. There was a highly significant relation between full active participation in most school settings and the children's motor and process skills. Conclusion: Children with SB need support to become more actively involved, particularly in unstructured peer activities. The school staff need to be informed that not only the motor skills but also the process skills have an impact on the children's active participation.},
  author       = {Peny-Dahlstrand, M. and Krumlinde-Sundholm, L. and Gosman-Hedstrom, Gunilla},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  keyword      = {Lipo-myelomeningocele,motor skills,myelomeningocele,participation,process skill,school,spina bifida},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {21},
  pages        = {1821--1827},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Patterns of participation in school-related activities and settings in children with spina bifida},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2012.758319},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2013},
}