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Process contributions of Australian ecosystems to interannual variations in the carbon cycle

Haverd, Vanessa; Smith, Benjamin LU and Trudinger, Cathy (2016) In Environmental Research Letters 11(5).
Abstract

New evidence is emerging that semi-arid ecosystems dominate interannual variability (IAV) of the global carbon cycle, largely via fluctuating water availability associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Recent evidence from global terrestrial biosphere modelling and satellite-based inversion of atmospheric CO2 point to a large role of Australian ecosystems in global carbon cycle variability, including a large contribution from Australia to the record land sink of 2011. However the specific mechanisms governing this variability, and their bioclimatic distribution within Australia, have not been identified. Here we provide a regional assessment, based on best available observational data, of IAV in the Australian... (More)

New evidence is emerging that semi-arid ecosystems dominate interannual variability (IAV) of the global carbon cycle, largely via fluctuating water availability associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Recent evidence from global terrestrial biosphere modelling and satellite-based inversion of atmospheric CO2 point to a large role of Australian ecosystems in global carbon cycle variability, including a large contribution from Australia to the record land sink of 2011. However the specific mechanisms governing this variability, and their bioclimatic distribution within Australia, have not been identified. Here we provide a regional assessment, based on best available observational data, of IAV in the Australian terrestrial carbon cycle and the role of Australia in the record land sink anomaly of 2011. We find that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is dominated by semi-arid ecosystems in the east of the continent, whereas the 2011 anomaly was more uniformly spread across most of the continent. Further, and in contrast to global modelling results suggesting that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is amplified by lags between production and decomposition, we find that, at continental scale, annual variations in production are dampened by annual variations in decomposition, with both fluxes responding positively to precipitation anomalies.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Australia, global carbon cycle, interannual variability, net carbon uptake, net primary production, precipitation anomalies, semi-arid ecosystems
in
Environmental Research Letters
volume
11
issue
5
publisher
IOP Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:84975507050
  • wos:000376484300013
ISSN
1748-9318
DOI
10.1088/1748-9326/11/5/054013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
029553ec-b898-4409-9e4b-ab086c72b42f
date added to LUP
2016-10-11 17:09:18
date last changed
2017-11-07 15:13:49
@article{029553ec-b898-4409-9e4b-ab086c72b42f,
  abstract     = {<p>New evidence is emerging that semi-arid ecosystems dominate interannual variability (IAV) of the global carbon cycle, largely via fluctuating water availability associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Recent evidence from global terrestrial biosphere modelling and satellite-based inversion of atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> point to a large role of Australian ecosystems in global carbon cycle variability, including a large contribution from Australia to the record land sink of 2011. However the specific mechanisms governing this variability, and their bioclimatic distribution within Australia, have not been identified. Here we provide a regional assessment, based on best available observational data, of IAV in the Australian terrestrial carbon cycle and the role of Australia in the record land sink anomaly of 2011. We find that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is dominated by semi-arid ecosystems in the east of the continent, whereas the 2011 anomaly was more uniformly spread across most of the continent. Further, and in contrast to global modelling results suggesting that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is amplified by lags between production and decomposition, we find that, at continental scale, annual variations in production are dampened by annual variations in decomposition, with both fluxes responding positively to precipitation anomalies.</p>},
  articleno    = {054013},
  author       = {Haverd, Vanessa and Smith, Benjamin and Trudinger, Cathy},
  issn         = {1748-9318},
  keyword      = {Australia,global carbon cycle,interannual variability,net carbon uptake,net primary production,precipitation anomalies,semi-arid ecosystems},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing},
  series       = {Environmental Research Letters},
  title        = {Process contributions of Australian ecosystems to interannual variations in the carbon cycle},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/11/5/054013},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}