Advanced

The extreme light infrastructure—attosecond light pulse source (ELI-ALPS) project

Charalambidis, Dimitris; Chikán, Viktor; Cormier, Eric; Dombi, Péter; Fülöp, József András; Janáky, Csaba; Kahaly, Subhendu; Kalashnikov, Mikhail; Kamperidis, Christos LU and Kühn, Sergei, et al. (2017) In Springer Series in Chemical Physics p.181-218
Abstract

Globally, large international research infrastructures have over many decades promoted excellence in science and technology. Aligned with the international practice, the Europe Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has developed and keeps updating a roadmap for research infrastructures. The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is one of the two large scale Laser Research Infrastructures (RI) proposed in the ESFRI Roadmap published in 2006. ELI aims to provide access to some of the most intense world-wide lasers for the international scientific user community, as well as secondary radiation and particle sources driven by them, offering to the users new interdisciplinary research opportunities. ELI is currently implemented as... (More)

Globally, large international research infrastructures have over many decades promoted excellence in science and technology. Aligned with the international practice, the Europe Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has developed and keeps updating a roadmap for research infrastructures. The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is one of the two large scale Laser Research Infrastructures (RI) proposed in the ESFRI Roadmap published in 2006. ELI aims to provide access to some of the most intense world-wide lasers for the international scientific user community, as well as secondary radiation and particle sources driven by them, offering to the users new interdisciplinary research opportunities. ELI is currently implemented as a distributed infrastructure in three pillars: ELI-Beamlines (ELI-BL) in Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic, ELI-Attosecond Light Pulse Source (ELI-ALPS) in Szeged, Hungary and ELI-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Magurele, Romania. This chapter is devoted to introduce the Hungarian pillar, ELI-ALPS, which will be operational in Szeged in 2018, with the primary mission to provide to the users the highest laboratory spatiotemporal resolution and a secondary mission to contribute to the technological development towards 200 petawatt (PW) lasers for high-field science, which is the ultimate goal of the ELI project. The chapter includes descriptions of the primary and secondary sources, while emphasis is given to selected examples of the scientific case of ELI-ALPS, presenting unique access offered by the technologies to be hosted in the infrastructure.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Springer Series in Chemical Physics
issue
9783319648392
pages
38 pages
publisher
Springer New York LLC
external identifiers
  • scopus:85039549128
ISSN
0172-6218
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-64840-8_10
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
04f9e8ff-cb79-47b3-8996-71b2bc5b9eb7
date added to LUP
2018-01-10 09:58:53
date last changed
2018-01-19 11:11:22
@inbook{04f9e8ff-cb79-47b3-8996-71b2bc5b9eb7,
  abstract     = {<p>Globally, large international research infrastructures have over many decades promoted excellence in science and technology. Aligned with the international practice, the Europe Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) has developed and keeps updating a roadmap for research infrastructures. The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is one of the two large scale Laser Research Infrastructures (RI) proposed in the ESFRI Roadmap published in 2006. ELI aims to provide access to some of the most intense world-wide lasers for the international scientific user community, as well as secondary radiation and particle sources driven by them, offering to the users new interdisciplinary research opportunities. ELI is currently implemented as a distributed infrastructure in three pillars: ELI-Beamlines (ELI-BL) in Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic, ELI-Attosecond Light Pulse Source (ELI-ALPS) in Szeged, Hungary and ELI-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Magurele, Romania. This chapter is devoted to introduce the Hungarian pillar, ELI-ALPS, which will be operational in Szeged in 2018, with the primary mission to provide to the users the highest laboratory spatiotemporal resolution and a secondary mission to contribute to the technological development towards 200 petawatt (PW) lasers for high-field science, which is the ultimate goal of the ELI project. The chapter includes descriptions of the primary and secondary sources, while emphasis is given to selected examples of the scientific case of ELI-ALPS, presenting unique access offered by the technologies to be hosted in the infrastructure.</p>},
  author       = {Charalambidis, Dimitris and Chikán, Viktor and Cormier, Eric and Dombi, Péter and Fülöp, József András and Janáky, Csaba and Kahaly, Subhendu and Kalashnikov, Mikhail and Kamperidis, Christos and Kühn, Sergei and Lepine, Franck and L’Huillier, Anne and Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo and Mondal, Sudipta and Osvay, Károly and Óvári, László and Rudawski, Piotr and Sansone, Giuseppe and Tzallas, Paris and Várallyay, Zoltán and Varjú, Katalin},
  issn         = {0172-6218},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9783319648392},
  pages        = {181--218},
  publisher    = {Springer New York LLC},
  series       = {Springer Series in Chemical Physics},
  title        = {The extreme light infrastructure—attosecond light pulse source (ELI-ALPS) project},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64840-8_10},
  year         = {2017},
}