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Assessing soil ecosystem processes – biodiversity relationships in a nature reserve in Central Europe

Caruso, Tancredi; Hammer, Edith C. LU ; Hempel, Stefan; Kohler, Josef; Kathryn Morris, E.; Veresoglou, Stavros D.; Opitz, Nora; Wehner, Jeannine and Rillig, Matthias C. (2018) In Plant and Soil 424(1-2). p.491-501
Abstract

Background and aims: Plant diversity – ecosystem processes relationships are essential to our understanding of ecosystem functioning. We aimed at disentangling the nature of such relationships in a mesotrophic grassland that was highly heterogeneous with regards to nutrient availability. Methods: Rather than targeting primary productivity, like most existing reports do, we focused our study on belowground ecosystem processes. We tested three, largely mutually exclusive, hypotheses of ecosystem processes relationships: the redundancy hypothesis, the insurance hypothesis and the centrifugal model hypothesis. We sampled the grassland twice within a single plant growing season in a spatially explicit way and assayed the soil for... (More)

Background and aims: Plant diversity – ecosystem processes relationships are essential to our understanding of ecosystem functioning. We aimed at disentangling the nature of such relationships in a mesotrophic grassland that was highly heterogeneous with regards to nutrient availability. Methods: Rather than targeting primary productivity, like most existing reports do, we focused our study on belowground ecosystem processes. We tested three, largely mutually exclusive, hypotheses of ecosystem processes relationships: the redundancy hypothesis, the insurance hypothesis and the centrifugal model hypothesis. We sampled the grassland twice within a single plant growing season in a spatially explicit way and assayed the soil for nitrification, urease activity, relative bacterial activity and a microbial community profile based on respiration while we simultaneously assessed plant diversity. Results: Results supported the centrifugal model. We justify the lack of support for the other two hypotheses on the basis of having conducted an observational study in an environmentally heterogeneous site. Conclusions: The centrifugal model hypothesis appears to be a very good predictive model for explaining diversity in observational, heterogeneous studies. The specific study represents one of the few observational studies that consider measures of ecosystem functioning other than primary productivity.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Diversity-productivity relationships, Ecosystem functioning, The centrifugal model hypothesis, The insurance hypothesis, The redundancy hypothesis
in
Plant and Soil
volume
424
issue
1-2
pages
11 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85045695899
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1007/s11104-017-3557-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
060489d6-1e70-4cd1-9bf4-90b9938beae8
date added to LUP
2018-05-07 14:37:28
date last changed
2019-05-17 12:55:59
@article{060489d6-1e70-4cd1-9bf4-90b9938beae8,
  abstract     = {<p>Background and aims: Plant diversity – ecosystem processes relationships are essential to our understanding of ecosystem functioning. We aimed at disentangling the nature of such relationships in a mesotrophic grassland that was highly heterogeneous with regards to nutrient availability. Methods: Rather than targeting primary productivity, like most existing reports do, we focused our study on belowground ecosystem processes. We tested three, largely mutually exclusive, hypotheses of ecosystem processes relationships: the redundancy hypothesis, the insurance hypothesis and the centrifugal model hypothesis. We sampled the grassland twice within a single plant growing season in a spatially explicit way and assayed the soil for nitrification, urease activity, relative bacterial activity and a microbial community profile based on respiration while we simultaneously assessed plant diversity. Results: Results supported the centrifugal model. We justify the lack of support for the other two hypotheses on the basis of having conducted an observational study in an environmentally heterogeneous site. Conclusions: The centrifugal model hypothesis appears to be a very good predictive model for explaining diversity in observational, heterogeneous studies. The specific study represents one of the few observational studies that consider measures of ecosystem functioning other than primary productivity.</p>},
  author       = {Caruso, Tancredi and Hammer, Edith C. and Hempel, Stefan and Kohler, Josef and Kathryn Morris, E. and Veresoglou, Stavros D. and Opitz, Nora and Wehner, Jeannine and Rillig, Matthias C.},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  keyword      = {Diversity-productivity relationships,Ecosystem functioning,The centrifugal model hypothesis,The insurance hypothesis,The redundancy hypothesis},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {491--501},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant and Soil},
  title        = {Assessing soil ecosystem processes – biodiversity relationships in a nature reserve in Central Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-017-3557-6},
  volume       = {424},
  year         = {2018},
}