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Brief preoperative smoking cessation counselling in relation to breast cancer surgery: a qualitative study

Thomsen, Thordis LU ; Esbensen, Bente Appel ; Samuelsen, Susanne ; Møller, Ann and Tønnesen, Hanne LU (2009) In European Journal of Oncology Nursing 13(5). p.344-349
Abstract
AIM: To describe how women smokers with newly diagnosed breast cancer experienced brief preoperative smoking cessation intervention in relation to breast cancer surgery. BACKGROUND: Preoperative smoking cessation intervention is relevant for short- and long-term risk reduction in newly diagnosed cancer patients. Our knowledge of how patients with malignant diagnoses experience preoperative smoking intervention is however scarce. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study that collected data through one-time individual, semi-structured interviews with 11 Danish women. Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was used for the analysis. RESULTS: The women experienced that brief preoperative smoking intervention triggered reflection upon smoking and... (More)
AIM: To describe how women smokers with newly diagnosed breast cancer experienced brief preoperative smoking cessation intervention in relation to breast cancer surgery. BACKGROUND: Preoperative smoking cessation intervention is relevant for short- and long-term risk reduction in newly diagnosed cancer patients. Our knowledge of how patients with malignant diagnoses experience preoperative smoking intervention is however scarce. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study that collected data through one-time individual, semi-structured interviews with 11 Danish women. Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was used for the analysis. RESULTS: The women experienced that brief preoperative smoking intervention triggered reflection upon smoking and health. They furthermore experienced the smoking intervention as an opportune aid to escaping the social stigma of being a smoker. Quitting in the context of cancer diagnosis was difficult for some women. They relapsed to smoking as an ingrown response to emotional distress. The smoking intervention heightened the women's awareness of their addiction to smoking; however, they expressed a need for prolonged smoking cessation support. For others, the smoking intervention was supportive of cessation, and these women experienced smoking cessation as an enactment of a duty of responsibility to themselves and those nearest to them. They furthermore experienced a sense of personal achievement, improved well-being and endorsement from family and friends. CONCLUSION: In newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, brief preoperative smoking intervention motivated smoking cessation. However, prolonged intervention, pre- and postoperatively, may more effectively support cessation in breast cancer patients and should therefore be evaluated in this patient population. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Oncology Nursing
volume
13
issue
5
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:70450257801
ISSN
1462-3889
DOI
10.1016/j.ejon.2009.04.006
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
063b2dd5-66f3-4c7d-bdba-d1d405d00e69
date added to LUP
2018-12-06 15:46:08
date last changed
2020-01-13 01:15:40
@article{063b2dd5-66f3-4c7d-bdba-d1d405d00e69,
  abstract     = {AIM: To describe how women smokers with newly diagnosed breast cancer experienced brief preoperative smoking cessation intervention in relation to breast cancer surgery. BACKGROUND: Preoperative smoking cessation intervention is relevant for short- and long-term risk reduction in newly diagnosed cancer patients. Our knowledge of how patients with malignant diagnoses experience preoperative smoking intervention is however scarce. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study that collected data through one-time individual, semi-structured interviews with 11 Danish women. Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was used for the analysis. RESULTS: The women experienced that brief preoperative smoking intervention triggered reflection upon smoking and health. They furthermore experienced the smoking intervention as an opportune aid to escaping the social stigma of being a smoker. Quitting in the context of cancer diagnosis was difficult for some women. They relapsed to smoking as an ingrown response to emotional distress. The smoking intervention heightened the women's awareness of their addiction to smoking; however, they expressed a need for prolonged smoking cessation support. For others, the smoking intervention was supportive of cessation, and these women experienced smoking cessation as an enactment of a duty of responsibility to themselves and those nearest to them. They furthermore experienced a sense of personal achievement, improved well-being and endorsement from family and friends. CONCLUSION: In newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, brief preoperative smoking intervention motivated smoking cessation. However, prolonged intervention, pre- and postoperatively, may more effectively support cessation in breast cancer patients and should therefore be evaluated in this patient population.},
  author       = {Thomsen, Thordis and Esbensen, Bente Appel and Samuelsen, Susanne and Møller, Ann and Tønnesen, Hanne},
  issn         = {1462-3889},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {344--349},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Oncology Nursing},
  title        = {Brief preoperative smoking cessation counselling in relation to breast cancer surgery: a qualitative study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejon.2009.04.006},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.ejon.2009.04.006},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2009},
}