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Sweden: internal migration in a high-migration Nordic country

Shuttleworth, Ian; Östh, John and Niedomysl, Thomas LU (2017) p.203-225
Abstract
Sweden was historically, and remains, a high-migration country. The chapter considers its experience using the census and population register data that are available for the analysis of migration over long historical periods, assessing their strengths and weaknesses. It then outlines levels of inter-parish moves from 1900 to 2015 as well as moves over shorter distances from the 1970s. The former oscillate around a stable level although with minor peaks in the 1930s, immediately after WWII, and to a lesser extent around 1970, possibly related to economic conditions and labour demand. After a trough in the 1980s, migration rates have since increased. An analysis of change in migration rates between the early 1990s and early 2000s using... (More)
Sweden was historically, and remains, a high-migration country. The chapter considers its experience using the census and population register data that are available for the analysis of migration over long historical periods, assessing their strengths and weaknesses. It then outlines levels of inter-parish moves from 1900 to 2015 as well as moves over shorter distances from the 1970s. The former oscillate around a stable level although with minor peaks in the 1930s, immediately after WWII, and to a lesser extent around 1970, possibly related to economic conditions and labour demand. After a trough in the 1980s, migration rates have since increased. An analysis of change in migration rates between the early 1990s and early 2000s using register data suggests that ageing has depressed all address-changing rates and has not been fully counteracted by changes in population composition by marital status and education levels that have moved people into more mobile groups. At the same time, people in each demographic sub-group tended to become more migratory. For longer-distance moves, increased education has had a positive effect on migration rate but again group-specific rates have also increased. It is suggested that this is a result of the expansion of higher education, the centralisation of services and jobs in the ʼnew economy’ and the welfare regime that reduces the risks in moving. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Internal migration in the developed world: are we becoming less mobile?
editor
Champion, Tony; Cooke, Thomas; Shuttleworth, Ian; ; and
pages
203 - 225
publisher
Routledge
external identifiers
  • scopus:85049957667
ISBN
9781317114499
9781472478061
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
070ae043-62d5-4cc3-895b-6411f82ce2aa
date added to LUP
2017-10-03 09:36:42
date last changed
2019-01-14 07:40:20
@inbook{070ae043-62d5-4cc3-895b-6411f82ce2aa,
  abstract     = {Sweden was historically, and remains, a high-migration country. The chapter considers its experience using the census and population register data that are available for the analysis of migration over long historical periods, assessing their strengths and weaknesses. It then outlines levels of inter-parish moves from 1900 to 2015 as well as moves over shorter distances from the 1970s. The former oscillate around a stable level although with minor peaks in the 1930s, immediately after WWII, and to a lesser extent around 1970, possibly related to economic conditions and labour demand. After a trough in the 1980s, migration rates have since increased. An analysis of change in migration rates between the early 1990s and early 2000s using register data suggests that ageing has depressed all address-changing rates and has not been fully counteracted by changes in population composition by marital status and education levels that have moved people into more mobile groups. At the same time, people in each demographic sub-group tended to become more migratory. For longer-distance moves, increased education has had a positive effect on migration rate but again group-specific rates have also increased. It is suggested that this is a result of the expansion of higher education, the centralisation of services and jobs in the ʼnew economy’ and the welfare regime that reduces the risks in moving. },
  author       = {Shuttleworth, Ian and Östh, John and Niedomysl, Thomas},
  editor       = {Champion, Tony and Cooke, Thomas and Shuttleworth, Ian},
  isbn         = {9781317114499 },
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {203--225},
  publisher    = {Routledge},
  title        = {Sweden: internal migration in a high-migration Nordic country},
  year         = {2017},
}