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Decreased postural control in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with chemotherapy

Einarsson, Einar Jón LU ; Patel, Mitesh; Petersen, Hannes; Wiebe, Thomas LU ; Fransson, Per Anders LU ; Magnusson, Måns LU and Moëll, Christian LU (2016) In Scientific Reports 6.
Abstract

The objective of cancer treatment is to secure survival. However, as chemotherapeutic agents can affect the central and peripheral nervous systems, patients must undergo a process of central compensation. We explored the effectiveness of this compensation process by measuring postural behaviour in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with chemotherapy (CTS). We recruited sixteen adults treated with chemotherapy in childhood for malignant solid (non-CNS) tumours and 25 healthy age-matched controls. Subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed during quiet and perturbed standing. Repeated balance perturbations through calf vibrations were used to study postural adaptation. Subjects were stratified into two groups... (More)

The objective of cancer treatment is to secure survival. However, as chemotherapeutic agents can affect the central and peripheral nervous systems, patients must undergo a process of central compensation. We explored the effectiveness of this compensation process by measuring postural behaviour in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with chemotherapy (CTS). We recruited sixteen adults treated with chemotherapy in childhood for malignant solid (non-CNS) tumours and 25 healthy age-matched controls. Subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed during quiet and perturbed standing. Repeated balance perturbations through calf vibrations were used to study postural adaptation. Subjects were stratified into two groups (treatment before or from 12 years of age) to determine age at treatment effects. Both quiet (p = 0.040) and perturbed standing (p ≤ 0.009) were significantly poorer in CTS compared to controls, particularly with eyes open and among those treated younger. Moreover, CTS had reduced levels of adaptation compared to controls, both with eyes closed and open. Hence, adults treated with chemotherapy for childhood cancer may suffer late effects of poorer postural control manifested as reduced contribution of vision and as reduced adaptation skills. These findings advocate development of chemotherapeutic agents that cause fewer long-term side effects when used for treating children.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scientific Reports
volume
6
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:84994834754
  • wos:000388088800001
ISSN
2045-2322
DOI
10.1038/srep36784
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07d741e8-f48c-4378-8e64-236385c89f38
date added to LUP
2016-11-28 14:35:32
date last changed
2017-08-11 09:46:15
@article{07d741e8-f48c-4378-8e64-236385c89f38,
  abstract     = {<p>The objective of cancer treatment is to secure survival. However, as chemotherapeutic agents can affect the central and peripheral nervous systems, patients must undergo a process of central compensation. We explored the effectiveness of this compensation process by measuring postural behaviour in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with chemotherapy (CTS). We recruited sixteen adults treated with chemotherapy in childhood for malignant solid (non-CNS) tumours and 25 healthy age-matched controls. Subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed during quiet and perturbed standing. Repeated balance perturbations through calf vibrations were used to study postural adaptation. Subjects were stratified into two groups (treatment before or from 12 years of age) to determine age at treatment effects. Both quiet (p = 0.040) and perturbed standing (p ≤ 0.009) were significantly poorer in CTS compared to controls, particularly with eyes open and among those treated younger. Moreover, CTS had reduced levels of adaptation compared to controls, both with eyes closed and open. Hence, adults treated with chemotherapy for childhood cancer may suffer late effects of poorer postural control manifested as reduced contribution of vision and as reduced adaptation skills. These findings advocate development of chemotherapeutic agents that cause fewer long-term side effects when used for treating children.</p>},
  articleno    = {36784},
  author       = {Einarsson, Einar Jón and Patel, Mitesh and Petersen, Hannes and Wiebe, Thomas and Fransson, Per Anders and Magnusson, Måns and Moëll, Christian},
  issn         = {2045-2322},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Scientific Reports},
  title        = {Decreased postural control in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with chemotherapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep36784},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}