Advanced

The significance of batch and patch test method in establishing contact allergy to fragrance mix I—EDEN Fragrance Study Group

Bruze, Magnus LU ; Mowitz, Martin LU ; Ofenloch, Robert; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Diepgen, Thomas L.; Elsner, Peter; Gonçalo, Margarida; Naldi, Luigi and Svensson, Åke LU (2019) In Contact Dermatitis
Abstract

Background: A fragrance mix consisting of eight separate fragrance ingredients (fragrance mix I [FM I]) is present in most baseline patch test series. Patch testing with the TRUE Test technique is considered to detect less contact allergy to FM I than testing with the Finn Chamber technique. Objective: To investigate the possible significance of batch and patch test method in establishing contact allergy to FM I. Methods: Three thousand one hundred and nineteen individuals representing a sample of the general population were patch tested with two batches of FM I with two patch test techniques at six dermatology clinics in five European countries. The TRUE Test technique and the Finn Chamber technique with pet. preparations were used.... (More)

Background: A fragrance mix consisting of eight separate fragrance ingredients (fragrance mix I [FM I]) is present in most baseline patch test series. Patch testing with the TRUE Test technique is considered to detect less contact allergy to FM I than testing with the Finn Chamber technique. Objective: To investigate the possible significance of batch and patch test method in establishing contact allergy to FM I. Methods: Three thousand one hundred and nineteen individuals representing a sample of the general population were patch tested with two batches of FM I with two patch test techniques at six dermatology clinics in five European countries. The TRUE Test technique and the Finn Chamber technique with pet. preparations were used. McNemar's test was used for statistical calculations. Results: The contact allergy prevalences varied between 0.7% and 2.6%. The patch tests with the mixes containing Evernia prunastri (oak moss) with a high content of chloratranol/atranol resulted in substantially more positive reactions than the corresponding tests with the mixes containing oak moss with a low content of chloratranol/atranol. The Finn Chamber technique detected significantly more contact allergic reactions than the TRUE Test technique (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The Finn Chamber technique detects more contact allergy to FM I than the TRUE Test technique.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
allergic contact dermatitis, chloratranol/atranol, delayed hypersensitivity, Evernia prunastri, general population, oak moss
in
Contact Dermatitis
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063997771
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.13253
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
08c4baed-52e4-4977-9d30-46a67fd493ad
date added to LUP
2019-04-25 15:27:25
date last changed
2019-05-14 04:54:15
@article{08c4baed-52e4-4977-9d30-46a67fd493ad,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: A fragrance mix consisting of eight separate fragrance ingredients (fragrance mix I [FM I]) is present in most baseline patch test series. Patch testing with the TRUE Test technique is considered to detect less contact allergy to FM I than testing with the Finn Chamber technique. Objective: To investigate the possible significance of batch and patch test method in establishing contact allergy to FM I. Methods: Three thousand one hundred and nineteen individuals representing a sample of the general population were patch tested with two batches of FM I with two patch test techniques at six dermatology clinics in five European countries. The TRUE Test technique and the Finn Chamber technique with pet. preparations were used. McNemar's test was used for statistical calculations. Results: The contact allergy prevalences varied between 0.7% and 2.6%. The patch tests with the mixes containing Evernia prunastri (oak moss) with a high content of chloratranol/atranol resulted in substantially more positive reactions than the corresponding tests with the mixes containing oak moss with a low content of chloratranol/atranol. The Finn Chamber technique detected significantly more contact allergic reactions than the TRUE Test technique (P &lt; 0.001). Conclusion: The Finn Chamber technique detects more contact allergy to FM I than the TRUE Test technique.</p>},
  author       = {Bruze, Magnus and Mowitz, Martin and Ofenloch, Robert and Coenraads, Pieter Jan and Diepgen, Thomas L. and Elsner, Peter and Gonçalo, Margarida and Naldi, Luigi and Svensson, Åke},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {allergic contact dermatitis,chloratranol/atranol,delayed hypersensitivity,Evernia prunastri,general population,oak moss},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {The significance of batch and patch test method in establishing contact allergy to fragrance mix I—EDEN Fragrance Study Group},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13253},
  year         = {2019},
}