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S100 protein - A marker of brain injury. The release in CABG patients without neurological complications

Johansson, P.; Jönsson, H.; Blomqvist, S; Westaby, S and Alling, C. LU (1996) In Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 30(SUPPL. 44). p.71-71
Abstract

S100 protein, normally not found in serum, is increased after cerebral injury and is also released during ECC. Patients with neurological complications following cardiac surgery have residual concentrations due to a prolonged release from cellular injury. The aim of the present study was to characterize the S100 release that occurs after CABG in a "normal" population without clinical brain dysfunction. S100 was measured, at termination of ECC (T0) and 5,15 and 48 hours thereafter, in 385 consecutive patients. 80% had CABG as the sole procedure and constituted the study population. Patients with a history of CNS pathology, known carotid artery disease or renal insufficiency were excluded from analysis. The S100 level at TO was increased... (More)

S100 protein, normally not found in serum, is increased after cerebral injury and is also released during ECC. Patients with neurological complications following cardiac surgery have residual concentrations due to a prolonged release from cellular injury. The aim of the present study was to characterize the S100 release that occurs after CABG in a "normal" population without clinical brain dysfunction. S100 was measured, at termination of ECC (T0) and 5,15 and 48 hours thereafter, in 385 consecutive patients. 80% had CABG as the sole procedure and constituted the study population. Patients with a history of CNS pathology, known carotid artery disease or renal insufficiency were excluded from analysis. The S100 level at TO was increased in 90% of patients and correlated to the duration of perfusion and age. S100 levels decreased rapidly and were below the detection limit (0.2 μg/L) in 35% of patients after 5 hours, in 72% after 15 hours and in 92% after 48 hours. The range of S100 values were 0.2μg/L - 9μg/L at TO, and 0.2μg/L - 5.9μg/L at 5 hours. S100 levels after CABG reflects the CNS trauma imposed by ECC. In the elderly, the response is more pronounced, thus indicating a greater risk for cerebral complications. The spread and uneven distribution early after ECC make the interpretation of isolated values difficult.

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author
publishing date
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publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
volume
30
issue
SUPPL. 44
pages
1 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:33747722751
ISSN
0036-5580
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0a003577-e96d-48af-8512-adbdbe8b7318
date added to LUP
2017-08-23 14:36:40
date last changed
2017-11-14 09:55:44
@article{0a003577-e96d-48af-8512-adbdbe8b7318,
  abstract     = {<p>S100 protein, normally not found in serum, is increased after cerebral injury and is also released during ECC. Patients with neurological complications following cardiac surgery have residual concentrations due to a prolonged release from cellular injury. The aim of the present study was to characterize the S100 release that occurs after CABG in a "normal" population without clinical brain dysfunction. S100 was measured, at termination of ECC (T0) and 5,15 and 48 hours thereafter, in 385 consecutive patients. 80% had CABG as the sole procedure and constituted the study population. Patients with a history of CNS pathology, known carotid artery disease or renal insufficiency were excluded from analysis. The S100 level at TO was increased in 90% of patients and correlated to the duration of perfusion and age. S100 levels decreased rapidly and were below the detection limit (0.2 μg/L) in 35% of patients after 5 hours, in 72% after 15 hours and in 92% after 48 hours. The range of S100 values were 0.2μg/L - 9μg/L at TO, and 0.2μg/L - 5.9μg/L at 5 hours. S100 levels after CABG reflects the CNS trauma imposed by ECC. In the elderly, the response is more pronounced, thus indicating a greater risk for cerebral complications. The spread and uneven distribution early after ECC make the interpretation of isolated values difficult.</p>},
  author       = {Johansson, P. and Jönsson, H. and Blomqvist, S and Westaby, S and Alling, C.},
  issn         = {0036-5580},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {SUPPL. 44},
  pages        = {71--71},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery},
  title        = {S100 protein - A marker of brain injury. The release in CABG patients without neurological complications},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {1996},
}