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Optimising Archaeologic Ceramics h-XRF Analyses

Bergman, Jakob LU and Lindahl, Anders LU (2016) CoDaWork'15 In Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics 187.
Abstract
We present the first results of an experiment which is aimed at ultimately producing recommendations for analysing archaeologic ceramics specimens using handheld XRF analysis devices. In this experiment we study the effects of different measurement durations, different number of measured points and three different types of surface treatments (breakage, polished, grounded) when analysing ceramics specimens, while controlling for nine different types of clay and three different types of temper (no temper, sand, rock), in total almost 1000 analysed points. For each measurement, the proportions of 36 different elements and all other elements are estimated. In the cases with multiple measurements of a specimen, the compositional centre of the... (More)
We present the first results of an experiment which is aimed at ultimately producing recommendations for analysing archaeologic ceramics specimens using handheld XRF analysis devices. In this experiment we study the effects of different measurement durations, different number of measured points and three different types of surface treatments (breakage, polished, grounded) when analysing ceramics specimens, while controlling for nine different types of clay and three different types of temper (no temper, sand, rock), in total almost 1000 analysed points. For each measurement, the proportions of 36 different elements and all other elements are estimated. In the cases with multiple measurements of a specimen, the compositional centre of the measurements is calculated. A complicating issue in the analysis is the large number of parts found to be below detection limit; 13 elements have more than 50 % of the measurements below detection limit and for more than half of those (almost) all measurements are below detection limit. We try nine different strategies for imputing the values. Each estimated elemental composition is compared to a reference estimate using the simplicial distance. The log distances are finally analysed using analysis of variance with main and interaction effects. We find that the different surface treatments have the greatest effect on the distances: grounded specimens yield the most accurate estimates and polished surfaces the least. We also find a significant effect of increasing the number of measured points, but less effect of increasing the duration of the measurements. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
archaeologic XRF analyses, archaeometric experiment, ceramics analysis, elemental composition analysis, simplicial distance
in
Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics
editor
Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni; Thió-Henestrosa, Santiago; and
volume
187
pages
11 pages
publisher
Springer International Publishing
conference name
CoDaWork'15
external identifiers
  • scopus:85006043623
ISBN
978-3-319-44810-7
978-3-319-44811-4
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-44811-4_1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a13e0e3-42bc-4076-b894-f288c84e0d86
date added to LUP
2016-08-15 12:57:45
date last changed
2017-02-24 11:51:18
@inbook{0a13e0e3-42bc-4076-b894-f288c84e0d86,
  abstract     = {We present the first results of an experiment which is aimed at ultimately producing recommendations for analysing archaeologic ceramics specimens using handheld XRF analysis devices. In this experiment we study the effects of different measurement durations, different number of measured points and three different types of surface treatments (breakage, polished, grounded) when analysing ceramics specimens, while controlling for nine different types of clay and three different types of temper (no temper, sand, rock), in total almost 1000 analysed points. For each measurement, the proportions of 36 different elements and all other elements are estimated. In the cases with multiple measurements of a specimen, the compositional centre of the measurements is calculated. A complicating issue in the analysis is the large number of parts found to be below detection limit; 13 elements have more than 50 % of the measurements below detection limit and for more than half of those (almost) all measurements are below detection limit. We try nine different strategies for imputing the values. Each estimated elemental composition is compared to a reference estimate using the simplicial distance. The log distances are finally analysed using analysis of variance with main and interaction effects. We find that the different surface treatments have the greatest effect on the distances: grounded specimens yield the most accurate estimates and polished surfaces the least. We also find a significant effect of increasing the number of measured points, but less effect of increasing the duration of the measurements.},
  author       = {Bergman, Jakob and Lindahl, Anders},
  editor       = {Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni and Thió-Henestrosa, Santiago},
  isbn         = {978-3-319-44810-7},
  keyword      = {archaeologic XRF analyses,archaeometric experiment,ceramics analysis,elemental composition analysis,simplicial distance},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {11},
  publisher    = {Springer International Publishing},
  series       = {Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics},
  title        = {Optimising Archaeologic Ceramics h-XRF Analyses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44811-4_1},
  volume       = {187},
  year         = {2016},
}