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A naturally aging knee, or development of early knee osteoarthritis?

Magnusson, K. LU ; Kumm, J. ; Turkiewicz, A. LU and Englund, M. LU orcid (2018) In Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 26(11). p.1447-1452
Abstract

Aim: To study the development of early knee osteoarthritis (OA) in subjects with and without risk factors for knee OA. Methods: We studied 340 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), aged 45–55 years (51% women), free of radiographic knee OA at baseline (n = 294 with and n = 46 without knee pain and other OA risk factors). At baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 96 months we compared the two groups for prevalence and overlap of knee OA as defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based OA), x-rays (Kellgren–Lawrence grade [KLG] ≥ 1), and pain, using a logistic mixed model. We studied the group differences (%) over time by subtracting the OA prevalence of those without risk factors from the group with risk factors. Results: The group... (More)

Aim: To study the development of early knee osteoarthritis (OA) in subjects with and without risk factors for knee OA. Methods: We studied 340 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), aged 45–55 years (51% women), free of radiographic knee OA at baseline (n = 294 with and n = 46 without knee pain and other OA risk factors). At baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 96 months we compared the two groups for prevalence and overlap of knee OA as defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based OA), x-rays (Kellgren–Lawrence grade [KLG] ≥ 1), and pain, using a logistic mixed model. We studied the group differences (%) over time by subtracting the OA prevalence of those without risk factors from the group with risk factors. Results: The group with OA risk factors had higher proportions of MRI-based OA than the group without OA risk factors at all visits, but the difference diminished at 72 months (72 months difference = 11.9%, 95% confidence intervals [CI] = −2.3–26.1). Further, at 72 months, the presence of KLG ≥ 1 were similar in the two groups (−3.5%, 95% CI = −15.2–8.2). The proportion fulfilling all three OA definitions was 1.7% at 24 months and 4.8% at 72 months of those with OA risk factors and 0% and 2.2%, respectively, in those without. Conclusion: Structural changes of the knee are common irrespective of the presence of pain or other OA risk factors. Such structural changes in absence of knee symptoms should probably be considered as risk factors for early OA rather than disease.

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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Early knee OA, MRI-based OA, Radiographic OA, Risk factors
in
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
volume
26
issue
11
pages
1447 - 1452
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:30041054
  • scopus:85050908773
ISSN
1063-4584
DOI
10.1016/j.joca.2018.04.020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0b2dffb5-fd29-483e-ae4f-ea144c801714
date added to LUP
2018-10-01 10:03:05
date last changed
2021-10-06 02:40:07
@article{0b2dffb5-fd29-483e-ae4f-ea144c801714,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: To study the development of early knee osteoarthritis (OA) in subjects with and without risk factors for knee OA. Methods: We studied 340 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), aged 45–55 years (51% women), free of radiographic knee OA at baseline (n = 294 with and n = 46 without knee pain and other OA risk factors). At baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 96 months we compared the two groups for prevalence and overlap of knee OA as defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based OA), x-rays (Kellgren–Lawrence grade [KLG] ≥ 1), and pain, using a logistic mixed model. We studied the group differences (%) over time by subtracting the OA prevalence of those without risk factors from the group with risk factors. Results: The group with OA risk factors had higher proportions of MRI-based OA than the group without OA risk factors at all visits, but the difference diminished at 72 months (72 months difference = 11.9%, 95% confidence intervals [CI] = −2.3–26.1). Further, at 72 months, the presence of KLG ≥ 1 were similar in the two groups (−3.5%, 95% CI = −15.2–8.2). The proportion fulfilling all three OA definitions was 1.7% at 24 months and 4.8% at 72 months of those with OA risk factors and 0% and 2.2%, respectively, in those without. Conclusion: Structural changes of the knee are common irrespective of the presence of pain or other OA risk factors. Such structural changes in absence of knee symptoms should probably be considered as risk factors for early OA rather than disease.</p>},
  author       = {Magnusson, K. and Kumm, J. and Turkiewicz, A. and Englund, M.},
  issn         = {1063-4584},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1447--1452},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Osteoarthritis and Cartilage},
  title        = {A naturally aging knee, or development of early knee osteoarthritis?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2018.04.020},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.joca.2018.04.020},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2018},
}