Advanced

Effects of neighbourhood and individual factors on injury risk in the entire Swedish population : a 12-month multilevel follow-up study

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Sanna and Johansson, Sven-Erik LU (2008) In European Journal of Epidemiology 23(3). p.191-203
Abstract

In this cumulative incidence study of the entire population of Sweden, we examined the association between neighbourhood income level and injury risks across a comprehensive set of individual variables. The population, stratified by age (0-14, 15-64, and > or =65 years), was followed for incident injury events in 1998. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the associations between neighbourhood income level and injury, including deaths from injury. Risks were analyzed, taking individual demographic and socioeconomic variables and alcohol/substance abuse into account. Falls were the most frequent non-fatal injuries in all age groups. People (0-14 years and 15-64 years) in the most deprived neighbourhoods exhibited higher... (More)

In this cumulative incidence study of the entire population of Sweden, we examined the association between neighbourhood income level and injury risks across a comprehensive set of individual variables. The population, stratified by age (0-14, 15-64, and > or =65 years), was followed for incident injury events in 1998. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the associations between neighbourhood income level and injury, including deaths from injury. Risks were analyzed, taking individual demographic and socioeconomic variables and alcohol/substance abuse into account. Falls were the most frequent non-fatal injuries in all age groups. People (0-14 years and 15-64 years) in the most deprived neighbourhoods exhibited higher odds of injuries (OR = 1.15; CI = 1.08-1.22 and OR = 1.34; CI = 1.26-1.43, respectively) than those in the same age groups in the most affluent neighbourhoods (OR = 1). In the full model, injury odds ratios decreased but remained significant in people 0-14 years. The large between-neighbourhood variance in all age groups indicated variation between neighbourhoods in injury incidence. Our results suggest that interventions focused on contextual aspects of neighbourhoods, in addition to individual behaviours, may have a positive impact on injury prevention.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Substance-Related Disorders, Sweden/epidemiology, Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology
in
European Journal of Epidemiology
volume
23
issue
3
pages
13 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:39649087551
ISSN
0393-2990
DOI
10.1007/s10654-007-9219-x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0b9c86d7-ba2a-40e0-b07a-b439a04a6c0c
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:03:43
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:45:43
@article{0b9c86d7-ba2a-40e0-b07a-b439a04a6c0c,
  abstract     = {<p>In this cumulative incidence study of the entire population of Sweden, we examined the association between neighbourhood income level and injury risks across a comprehensive set of individual variables. The population, stratified by age (0-14, 15-64, and &gt; or =65 years), was followed for incident injury events in 1998. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the associations between neighbourhood income level and injury, including deaths from injury. Risks were analyzed, taking individual demographic and socioeconomic variables and alcohol/substance abuse into account. Falls were the most frequent non-fatal injuries in all age groups. People (0-14 years and 15-64 years) in the most deprived neighbourhoods exhibited higher odds of injuries (OR = 1.15; CI = 1.08-1.22 and OR = 1.34; CI = 1.26-1.43, respectively) than those in the same age groups in the most affluent neighbourhoods (OR = 1). In the full model, injury odds ratios decreased but remained significant in people 0-14 years. The large between-neighbourhood variance in all age groups indicated variation between neighbourhoods in injury incidence. Our results suggest that interventions focused on contextual aspects of neighbourhoods, in addition to individual behaviours, may have a positive impact on injury prevention.</p>},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Sanna and Johansson, Sven-Erik},
  issn         = {0393-2990},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Age Distribution,Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Child,Child, Preschool,Female,Follow-Up Studies,Humans,Infant,Male,Middle Aged,Residence Characteristics,Risk Factors,Socioeconomic Factors,Substance-Related Disorders,Sweden/epidemiology,Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {191--203},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Effects of neighbourhood and individual factors on injury risk in the entire Swedish population : a 12-month multilevel follow-up study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-007-9219-x},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2008},
}