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Heparin-binding protein: An early indicator of critical illness and predictor of outcome in cardiac arrest.

Dankiewicz, Josef LU ; Linder, Adam LU ; Annborn, Martin LU ; Rundgren, Malin LU and Friberg, Hans LU (2013) In Resuscitation 84(7). p.935-939
Abstract
AIM: To investigate plasma levels of the neutrophil-borne heparin-binding protein (HBP) in patients with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA), and to study any association to severity of organ failure, incidence of infection and neurological outcome. METHODS: This study included 84 patients with CA of mixed origin who were treated with hypothermia. Plasma samples from 7 time points during the first 72h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were collected and analyzed for HBP with an ELISA. Outcomes were dichotomized: a cerebral performance category scale (CPC) of 1-2 at 6 months follow-up was considered a good outcome, a CPC of 3-5, a poor outcome. Patient data, including APACHE II and SOFA-scores were retrieved from the... (More)
AIM: To investigate plasma levels of the neutrophil-borne heparin-binding protein (HBP) in patients with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA), and to study any association to severity of organ failure, incidence of infection and neurological outcome. METHODS: This study included 84 patients with CA of mixed origin who were treated with hypothermia. Plasma samples from 7 time points during the first 72h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were collected and analyzed for HBP with an ELISA. Outcomes were dichotomized: a cerebral performance category scale (CPC) of 1-2 at 6 months follow-up was considered a good outcome, a CPC of 3-5, a poor outcome. Patient data, including APACHE II and SOFA-scores were retrieved from the computerized system for quality assurance for intensive care. RESULTS: At 6h and 12h after CA, plasma levels of HBP were significantly higher among patients with a poor outcome. A receiver operated characteristics (ROC)-analysis yielded respective areas under curve (AUC) values of 0.68 and 0.70. This was similar to APACHE II and SOFA-score AUC values. There was a significant correlation between early elevated HBP-values and time to ROSC. HBP-levels were not higher in patients with infections at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated HBP is an early indicator of organ failure and poor neurological outcome after CA, independent of microbial infection, and should be further evaluated in prospective trials. The temporal profile of HBP is suggestive of a role in the pathogenesis of critical illness after CA. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Resuscitation
volume
84
issue
7
pages
935 - 939
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000320997000020
  • pmid:23318914
  • scopus:84878859615
ISSN
1873-1570
DOI
10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.01.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f538837-c9a8-49b4-bf58-4ff2ae569b08 (old id 3438721)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23318914?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-02-04 13:12:30
date last changed
2019-04-23 01:40:38
@article{0f538837-c9a8-49b4-bf58-4ff2ae569b08,
  abstract     = {AIM: To investigate plasma levels of the neutrophil-borne heparin-binding protein (HBP) in patients with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA), and to study any association to severity of organ failure, incidence of infection and neurological outcome. METHODS: This study included 84 patients with CA of mixed origin who were treated with hypothermia. Plasma samples from 7 time points during the first 72h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were collected and analyzed for HBP with an ELISA. Outcomes were dichotomized: a cerebral performance category scale (CPC) of 1-2 at 6 months follow-up was considered a good outcome, a CPC of 3-5, a poor outcome. Patient data, including APACHE II and SOFA-scores were retrieved from the computerized system for quality assurance for intensive care. RESULTS: At 6h and 12h after CA, plasma levels of HBP were significantly higher among patients with a poor outcome. A receiver operated characteristics (ROC)-analysis yielded respective areas under curve (AUC) values of 0.68 and 0.70. This was similar to APACHE II and SOFA-score AUC values. There was a significant correlation between early elevated HBP-values and time to ROSC. HBP-levels were not higher in patients with infections at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated HBP is an early indicator of organ failure and poor neurological outcome after CA, independent of microbial infection, and should be further evaluated in prospective trials. The temporal profile of HBP is suggestive of a role in the pathogenesis of critical illness after CA.},
  author       = {Dankiewicz, Josef and Linder, Adam and Annborn, Martin and Rundgren, Malin and Friberg, Hans},
  issn         = {1873-1570},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {935--939},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Resuscitation},
  title        = {Heparin-binding protein: An early indicator of critical illness and predictor of outcome in cardiac arrest.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.01.006},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2013},
}