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The effects of activated protein C and prostacyclin on arterial oxygenation and protein leakage in the lung and the gut under endotoxaemia in the rat.

Dubniks, Maris LU and Grände, Per-Olof LU (2008) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 52. p.381-387
Abstract
Background: Based on the anti-adhesive/anti-aggregatory and permeability-reducing properties of activated protein C (APC) and prostacyclin (PGI(2)), we analysed and compared these substances regarding their efficacy in counteracting transcapillary leakage of albumin in the lung and the gut, and in improving arterial oxygenation under a condition of inflammation. Methods: The randomized and blinded study was performed on 31 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Inflammation was induced by continuous infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Six hours after the start of the LPS infusion (240,000 U/kg/h), a simultaneous infusion of saline (control group) or 8 mug/kg/min of human recombinant APC or 2 ng/kg/min of PGI(2) was... (More)
Background: Based on the anti-adhesive/anti-aggregatory and permeability-reducing properties of activated protein C (APC) and prostacyclin (PGI(2)), we analysed and compared these substances regarding their efficacy in counteracting transcapillary leakage of albumin in the lung and the gut, and in improving arterial oxygenation under a condition of inflammation. Methods: The randomized and blinded study was performed on 31 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Inflammation was induced by continuous infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Six hours after the start of the LPS infusion (240,000 U/kg/h), a simultaneous infusion of saline (control group) or 8 mug/kg/min of human recombinant APC or 2 ng/kg/min of PGI(2) was started and continued for 24 h (n=8 per group). The study also included a sham group. Transcapillary leakage of albumin was measured from the ratio between tissue radioactivity [counts per minute (cpm)/g tissue] and actual amount of radioactivity given (cpm/g body weight of (125)I-albumin). Oxygenation was assessed from arterial and central venous blood samples. Results: LPS induced albumin leakage in the gut and the lung, and impaired blood oxygenation. In the lung, the leakage was lower in the PGI(2) group than in the APC and the control groups (P<0.05). In the gut, it was lower in the APC and the PGI(2) groups than in the control group (P<0.05). Oxygenation was better in the APC and PGI(2) groups than in the control group. Conclusion: Our data suggest that both APC and low-dose PGI(2) are beneficial in LPS-induced inflammation in the rat, by reducing albumin leakage and improving blood oxygenation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
52
pages
381 - 387
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:18205901
  • wos:000252963600010
  • scopus:38849198466
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01532.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75f406af-7218-4bc3-8889-3b7cbfe587f7 (old id 1021273)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18205901?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-02-08 15:01:49
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:30:38
@article{75f406af-7218-4bc3-8889-3b7cbfe587f7,
  abstract     = {Background: Based on the anti-adhesive/anti-aggregatory and permeability-reducing properties of activated protein C (APC) and prostacyclin (PGI(2)), we analysed and compared these substances regarding their efficacy in counteracting transcapillary leakage of albumin in the lung and the gut, and in improving arterial oxygenation under a condition of inflammation. Methods: The randomized and blinded study was performed on 31 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Inflammation was induced by continuous infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Six hours after the start of the LPS infusion (240,000 U/kg/h), a simultaneous infusion of saline (control group) or 8 mug/kg/min of human recombinant APC or 2 ng/kg/min of PGI(2) was started and continued for 24 h (n=8 per group). The study also included a sham group. Transcapillary leakage of albumin was measured from the ratio between tissue radioactivity [counts per minute (cpm)/g tissue] and actual amount of radioactivity given (cpm/g body weight of (125)I-albumin). Oxygenation was assessed from arterial and central venous blood samples. Results: LPS induced albumin leakage in the gut and the lung, and impaired blood oxygenation. In the lung, the leakage was lower in the PGI(2) group than in the APC and the control groups (P&lt;0.05). In the gut, it was lower in the APC and the PGI(2) groups than in the control group (P&lt;0.05). Oxygenation was better in the APC and PGI(2) groups than in the control group. Conclusion: Our data suggest that both APC and low-dose PGI(2) are beneficial in LPS-induced inflammation in the rat, by reducing albumin leakage and improving blood oxygenation.},
  author       = {Dubniks, Maris and Grände, Per-Olof},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {381--387},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {The effects of activated protein C and prostacyclin on arterial oxygenation and protein leakage in the lung and the gut under endotoxaemia in the rat.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2007.01532.x},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2008},
}