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Pulmonary gas exchange is reduced by the cardiovascular diving response in resting humans.

Andersson, Johan LU ; Biasoletto-Tjellström, Gustaf and Schagatay, Erika K A (2008) In Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 160(3). p.320-324
Abstract
The diving response reduces the pulmonary O(2) uptake in exercising humans, but it has been debated whether this effect is present at rest. Therefore, respiratory and cardiovascular responses were recorded in 16 resting subjects, performing apnea in air and apnea with face immersion in cold water (10 degrees C). Duration of apneas were predetermined to be identical in both conditions (average: 145s) and based on individual maximal capacity (average: 184s). Compared to apnea in air, an augmented diving response was elicited by apnea with face immersion. The O(2) uptake from the lungs was reduced compared to the resting eupneic control (4.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)), during apnea in air (3.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)) and even more so during apnea with face... (More)
The diving response reduces the pulmonary O(2) uptake in exercising humans, but it has been debated whether this effect is present at rest. Therefore, respiratory and cardiovascular responses were recorded in 16 resting subjects, performing apnea in air and apnea with face immersion in cold water (10 degrees C). Duration of apneas were predetermined to be identical in both conditions (average: 145s) and based on individual maximal capacity (average: 184s). Compared to apnea in air, an augmented diving response was elicited by apnea with face immersion. The O(2) uptake from the lungs was reduced compared to the resting eupneic control (4.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)), during apnea in air (3.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)) and even more so during apnea with face immersion (3.4mlmin(-1)kg(-1)). We conclude that the cardiovascular adjustments of the diving response reduces pulmonary gas exchange in resting humans, allowing longer apneas by preserving the lungs' O(2) store for use by vital organs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Vasoconstriction, Breath hold, Bradycardia, Alveolar gas exchange
in
Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
volume
160
issue
3
pages
320 - 324
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:18088568
  • wos:000254770600010
  • scopus:44449100208
ISSN
1878-1519
DOI
10.1016/j.resp.2007.10.016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
703e603a-4b73-419e-8445-e57d88d01b6d (old id 1035163)
date added to LUP
2008-05-07 12:09:41
date last changed
2017-02-05 03:30:15
@article{703e603a-4b73-419e-8445-e57d88d01b6d,
  abstract     = {The diving response reduces the pulmonary O(2) uptake in exercising humans, but it has been debated whether this effect is present at rest. Therefore, respiratory and cardiovascular responses were recorded in 16 resting subjects, performing apnea in air and apnea with face immersion in cold water (10 degrees C). Duration of apneas were predetermined to be identical in both conditions (average: 145s) and based on individual maximal capacity (average: 184s). Compared to apnea in air, an augmented diving response was elicited by apnea with face immersion. The O(2) uptake from the lungs was reduced compared to the resting eupneic control (4.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)), during apnea in air (3.6mlmin(-1)kg(-1)) and even more so during apnea with face immersion (3.4mlmin(-1)kg(-1)). We conclude that the cardiovascular adjustments of the diving response reduces pulmonary gas exchange in resting humans, allowing longer apneas by preserving the lungs' O(2) store for use by vital organs.},
  author       = {Andersson, Johan and Biasoletto-Tjellström, Gustaf and Schagatay, Erika K A},
  issn         = {1878-1519},
  keyword      = {Vasoconstriction,Breath hold,Bradycardia,Alveolar gas exchange},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {320--324},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology},
  title        = {Pulmonary gas exchange is reduced by the cardiovascular diving response in resting humans.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2007.10.016},
  volume       = {160},
  year         = {2008},
}