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Evaluations of Swedish outdoor living environments: Cultural impact of environmental perceptions

Tucker Cross, Lisa LU (2007) In Journal of Architectural and Planning Research 24(4). p.338-349
Abstract
In a previous study by Tucker Cross and Kiiller (2004), a method was developed for describing environmental atmosphere based on Swedish expert evaluations of six multifamily housing areas in southern Sweden. The assessments of these experts were validated by residents using post-occupancy evaluations (POE). The main purpose of that study was to determine if experts could predict environmental qualities that residents desired within their outdoor living environment. One aim of the present study was to compare the Swedish expert findings with the assessments made by foreign professionals using the same checklist in order to discover any significant agreements and differences between these groups. The checklist used in this and the previous... (More)
In a previous study by Tucker Cross and Kiiller (2004), a method was developed for describing environmental atmosphere based on Swedish expert evaluations of six multifamily housing areas in southern Sweden. The assessments of these experts were validated by residents using post-occupancy evaluations (POE). The main purpose of that study was to determine if experts could predict environmental qualities that residents desired within their outdoor living environment. One aim of the present study was to compare the Swedish expert findings with the assessments made by foreign professionals using the same checklist in order to discover any significant agreements and differences between these groups. The checklist used in this and the previous studies consisted of items that cover general layout, complexity and coherence, identity and affection, construction materials, greenery, climate, pollution and noise, ecological sustainability, meeting areas, privacy, security and traffic control, and maintenance. One concern regarding the use of checklists by professionals from different regions might be the validity of specific items and the relevance of these items to various cultural aspects. Despite the large differences in cultural backgrounds between the professionals coming from Northern Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, and Eastern Europe, the environmental assessments showed consistent similarities between the groups. Eighteen of the items significantly differentiated between the residential housing areas. For four items, significant group differences were noted, and for three items there was a significant interaction effect between groups and areas. The instrument has shown its potential as a reliable and valid checklist even when used by a diverse group of foreign professionals. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
environmental atmosphere, evaluation, housing areas, POE
in
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research
volume
24
issue
4
pages
338 - 349
publisher
Locke Science Publishing Company
ISSN
0738-0895
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ba25a970-c1e5-4f60-92fd-18d73343f301 (old id 1039991)
alternative location
http://apps.isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=1&SID=Q2cJMg@lD8el@Al3ohk&page=1&doc=1
date added to LUP
2008-10-31 15:08:31
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:54:21
@article{ba25a970-c1e5-4f60-92fd-18d73343f301,
  abstract     = {In a previous study by Tucker Cross and Kiiller (2004), a method was developed for describing environmental atmosphere based on Swedish expert evaluations of six multifamily housing areas in southern Sweden. The assessments of these experts were validated by residents using post-occupancy evaluations (POE). The main purpose of that study was to determine if experts could predict environmental qualities that residents desired within their outdoor living environment. One aim of the present study was to compare the Swedish expert findings with the assessments made by foreign professionals using the same checklist in order to discover any significant agreements and differences between these groups. The checklist used in this and the previous studies consisted of items that cover general layout, complexity and coherence, identity and affection, construction materials, greenery, climate, pollution and noise, ecological sustainability, meeting areas, privacy, security and traffic control, and maintenance. One concern regarding the use of checklists by professionals from different regions might be the validity of specific items and the relevance of these items to various cultural aspects. Despite the large differences in cultural backgrounds between the professionals coming from Northern Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, and Eastern Europe, the environmental assessments showed consistent similarities between the groups. Eighteen of the items significantly differentiated between the residential housing areas. For four items, significant group differences were noted, and for three items there was a significant interaction effect between groups and areas. The instrument has shown its potential as a reliable and valid checklist even when used by a diverse group of foreign professionals.},
  author       = {Tucker Cross, Lisa},
  issn         = {0738-0895},
  keyword      = {environmental atmosphere,evaluation,housing areas,POE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {338--349},
  publisher    = {Locke Science Publishing Company},
  series       = {Journal of Architectural and Planning Research},
  title        = {Evaluations of Swedish outdoor living environments: Cultural impact of environmental perceptions},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2007},
}