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Characterization of lipid particles in shed mediastinal blood.

Eyjolfsson, Atli LU ; Scicluna, Sara LU ; Johnsson, Per; Petersson, Filip and Bjursten, Henrik LU (2008) In Annals of Thoracic Surgery 85(3). p.978-981
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Shed mediastinal blood is known to be a source of microemboli in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to characterize in detail the lipid particles found in this blood. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 24 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial and shed blood was analyzed using the Coulter counter technique to establish the number and size of particles. The composition of these lipid particles was compared with that of adipose tissue from the mediastinum using gas chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the lipid particles in samples of shed blood. RESULTS: Lipid particles in the size range of 10 to 60 microm were characterized in shed... (More)
BACKGROUND: Shed mediastinal blood is known to be a source of microemboli in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to characterize in detail the lipid particles found in this blood. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 24 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial and shed blood was analyzed using the Coulter counter technique to establish the number and size of particles. The composition of these lipid particles was compared with that of adipose tissue from the mediastinum using gas chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the lipid particles in samples of shed blood. RESULTS: Lipid particles in the size range of 10 to 60 microm were characterized in shed mediastinal blood, and more than 300,000 particles per milliliter of blood were found. Triglyceride profiles in these lipid particles and in adipose tissue were similar, suggesting that their origin is the mediastinum. Scanning electron microscopy showed spherical formations corresponding in size to the particles counted using the Coulter counter. CONCLUSIONS: During the past decade attention has focused on microembolism in cardiac surgery, and this study has helped define the problem. Different strategies, such as eliminating the use of shed mediastinal blood or purifying the blood by different techniques, may improve the results of cardiac surgery in the future. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Thoracic Surgery
volume
85
issue
3
pages
978 - 981
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:18291182
  • wos:000253441500026
  • scopus:39149111235
ISSN
1552-6259
DOI
10.1016/j.athoracsur.2007.12.067
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae2df76f-e6bc-4710-863c-8accee43c506 (old id 1041644)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18291182?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-03-04 11:01:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:40:28
@article{ae2df76f-e6bc-4710-863c-8accee43c506,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Shed mediastinal blood is known to be a source of microemboli in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to characterize in detail the lipid particles found in this blood. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 24 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial and shed blood was analyzed using the Coulter counter technique to establish the number and size of particles. The composition of these lipid particles was compared with that of adipose tissue from the mediastinum using gas chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the lipid particles in samples of shed blood. RESULTS: Lipid particles in the size range of 10 to 60 microm were characterized in shed mediastinal blood, and more than 300,000 particles per milliliter of blood were found. Triglyceride profiles in these lipid particles and in adipose tissue were similar, suggesting that their origin is the mediastinum. Scanning electron microscopy showed spherical formations corresponding in size to the particles counted using the Coulter counter. CONCLUSIONS: During the past decade attention has focused on microembolism in cardiac surgery, and this study has helped define the problem. Different strategies, such as eliminating the use of shed mediastinal blood or purifying the blood by different techniques, may improve the results of cardiac surgery in the future.},
  author       = {Eyjolfsson, Atli and Scicluna, Sara and Johnsson, Per and Petersson, Filip and Bjursten, Henrik},
  issn         = {1552-6259},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {978--981},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Annals of Thoracic Surgery},
  title        = {Characterization of lipid particles in shed mediastinal blood.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2007.12.067},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2008},
}